Monthly Archives: April 2016

KIDS, GUNS & SWIMMING POOLS: 3 Myths That Can Hurt Your Children

New York University professor Dave Kopel has written an important article about the many myths surrounding guns and kids.

“Scary Tales About Kids & Guns” separates fact from fiction. The article reveals important information that every parent should know about guns and their children.

Myth 1: People who use guns to commit murder are regular people who get angry or ‘snap’.

Fact: 90% of murderers have criminal records. The majority of gun crime is committed by criminals. [NY Times April 8, 2006 – The Baltimore Sun Jan 1, 2007]

Myth 2: Accidental shootings of children are at epidemic proportions.

Fact: Since 1950 the rate of fatal gun accidents among children has declined by 90%. In 2007 65 children died in gun accidents in the United States. [Brief District of Columbia v. Heller]

Myth 3: Being killed by guns is a leading cause of death for children.

Fact: Bathtubs kill twice as many children as guns and swimming pools kill three times as many children as guns in the U.S. each year. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention]

The facts are clear from a comprehensive study of gun accidents [Accidents Analysis & Prevention Waller & Whorton]; people who cause these accidents have higher rates of arrest for violence, alcohol abuse, highway crashes and moving violations. Personality defects and criminal behavior is the primary contributor to gun accidents.

While gun crime is a serious issue in the United States accurate facts are critical when parents make decisions about their children’s safety.

 

Protecting Your Children How To Hire Babysitters Or Choose Daycare

The following information will help you to better protect your children from abuse by nannies, babysitters and aggressive family/friends. Please feel free to share this information sheet with others. You may contact our firm info@seraph.net at any time if you need additional information.

INTERVIEWING CHILDCARE WORKERS

When you interview potential childcare workers, it is important to understand their mental stability and their potential for violence. The following questions will help you to “profile” their mental state and make a more accurate decision.

  1. Describe the best family you ever worked for and describe the worst family you ever worked for?

Listen carefully to their answers, does the person talk briefly about the best family and excessively about the worst family. Watch for statements like “personality conflict”. Does the person take any responsibility for their role in leaving the worst family? If not, this person is an emotionally immature person who lives in denial.

  1. What are some things that bothered you about the last family that you worked for?

Does the person give a long list with a “know it all” tone. Are their comments constructive or angry?

  1. Did you ever make suggestions?

Listen for negative comments like, “yes, but they never listened to me”.

  1. How would you solve a problem with the kids fighting over a toy for example?

Wrong answers would contain themes of confrontation or excessive disciplinary attitudes.

  1. Who is your best friend and how would you describe your friendship?

Plenty of people cannot come up with a single name in response to this question. If they give a name that is not listed as a reference, ask why? Then ask if you can call that friend as a reference.

The use of hidden cameras is an excellent legal way to monitor the behavior of childcare workers or others who enter your home.