Category Archives: forensics

Mass Shootings: Millennials’ Loneliness Plague

A third of US millennials feel lonely, per a recent YouGov survey, and a fifth say they have no friends, notes The Week’s Matthew Walther.

And while “we can make facile jokes about avocado toast and baristas with degrees in cultural studies” he is “not sure we should find them amusing.”

The crisis of modern loneliness is but one facet of an atomized, soulless society: “We cannot concentrate on anything. We don’t go anywhere, not even to buy food or diapers. . . . The richer we happen to be, the less likely we are to take time off to enjoy ourselves, despite generous vacation allowances.

The poorer we are, the more likely we are to kill ourselves with drugs, alcohol and guns. Even fornication is boring — we have porn for that.”

Ohio Shooter Extreme Leftist – Texas Shooter Extreme Right Wing: Mass Shootings Not About Politics Something Scarier

Connor Betts / Patrick Crusius

For political types the recent mass shootings in Ohio and Texas are about ideology, sadly they are blinded by their own dogma.

Let’s look at the facts:

Dayton, Ohio – Shooter Connor Betts

  • He wore a mask, Ballistic vest and ear protection.

ASSESSMENT He was not a suicide shooter, he planned on escaping and concealing his identity. This is unusual for this type of crime.

  • He came to the event with his sister in the same vehicle but ended up killing her.

ASSESSMENT This means that there was a personal element.

  • He was a Sexual Sadist.

A classmate told the Daily News that Betts had “fantasized about tying her up and slitting her throat” and he told her he was scared he had those thoughts. She said she was included on a hit list, but her concerns weren’t taken seriously when she reported them.

“found a notebook where he reportedly wrote a list of people who he wanted to rape, kill and skin their bodies.”

  • He classified himself on social media as:

“leftist”

“i’m going to hell and i’m not coming back.”

he would happily vote for Democrat Elizabeth Warren

praised Satan, “#selfie4satan #HailSatan @SatanTweeting.” 

was upset about the 2016 presidential election results

“I want socialism, and i’ll not wait for the idiots to finally come round to understanding.”

  • He was a psychology major.
  • Suspended during his high school years for compiling a “hit list” of those he wanted to kill and a “rape list” of girls he wanted to sexually assault.

ASSESSMENT while the police investigated, and the school system suspected him. He was not charged allegedly with a crime and after a short time, school officials allowed him back to the school.

  • Graduated From Bellbrook High School, Where Students Considered Him a Bully 

El Paso, Texas – Shooter Patrick Crusius

  • He was a loner.

ASSESSMENT This type of behavior is not healthy or biologically normal. Humans seek connection with others.

  • Manifesto on 8chan was unusual.

Stated his Ideology predated Trump.

MESSIAH COMPLEX “I can no longer bear the shame of inaction knowing that our founding fathers have endowed me with the rights needed to save our country from the brink destruction. 

USES MARXIST TERMS “Our European comrades don’t have the gun rights needed to repel the millions of invaders that plaque (sic) their country. People who are hypocrites because they support imperialistic wars that have caused the loss of tens of thousands of American lives and untold numbers of civilian lives. 

“My death is likely inevitable. If I’m not killed by the police, then I’ll probably be gunned down by one of the invaders. Capture in this case if far worse than dying during the shooting because I’ll get the death penalty anyway. Worse still is that I would live knowing that my family despises me. This is why I’m not going to surrender even if I run out of ammo. If I’m captured, it will be because I was subdued somehow. Remember: it is not cowardly to pick low hanging fruit. AKA Don’t attack heavily guarded areas to fulfill your super soldier COD fantasy. Attack low security targets. Even though you might out gun a security guard or police man, they likely beat you in armor, training and numbers. Do not throw away your life on an unnecessarily dangerous target,” he wrote. “If a target seems too hot, live to fight another day.”

ASSESSMENT He moves from fatalism about his life to regard for life.

  • LinkedIn Page, Cruscius Says He’s ‘Not Really Motivated to do Anything More Than What’s Necessary to Get By’

ASSESSMENT This type of personality trait is common in children who come from overprotective parents who create a codependency in their children or parents who have an emotional disconnect and no accountability for their children’s behaviors. Parenting from the extremes.

Conclusion

In my experience mass shooters have three things in common:

  1. Dysfunctional families. Codependency, lack of accountability and / or abuse.
  2. Mental health issues that are not dealt with by family and school officials.
  3. Isolation.

These shooters are created not born that way. Adults who should act in a mature or professional manner failed these people when they were children.

The use of child welfare laws to hold parents and caregivers accountable will go a long way towards reducing these crimes.

Dale Yeager

Sources:

https://heavy.com/news/2019/08/connor-betts/amp/

https://www.foxnews.com/us/dayton-ohio-shooting-suspect-hit-list

UK Style Acid Attacks Begin in U.S.

acid-attack NYC

A teen badly injured when she was doused with acid at an East Village party in May is calling on cops to catch the person who left her with debilitating third-degree burns.

Ava Aldrich, 18, spent two nights in the ICU at Weill Cornell Medical Center and underwent skin-graft surgery in June after she was among a dozen teens burned when drain-clearing sulfuric acid was thrown at them during a party at a NYCHA development.

“It was extremely painful,” the young Manhattan woman told The Post. “I felt like my legs were burning. I saw holes in my jeans, and it was eating into my skin.”

Aldrich and more than 100 other teens had shown up at the First Houses on East Third Street on May 4 for a party advertised on social media when paint and a caustic substance — later revealed to be an industrial drain cleaner — started raining down on them from above at around 10 p.m.

Witnesses said it came from a fourth-floor apartment which overlooks an outdoor entrance to the basement where the party was held, according to law-enforcement sources.

At least 10 teens between ages 15 and 18 were hospitalized with minor burns — but Aldrich was severely injured. 

She suffered third-degree burns to her legs and will have to wear compression bandages 23 hours a day for at least the next nine months.

“I’m obviously frustrated because they can’t arrest who did this,” said Aldrich, a recent Eleanor Roosevelt HS graduate.

She plans to attend the University of California Santa Cruz next year, and will spend her first year of college in the bandages.

Detectives from the Ninth Precinct have talked to several people who were in the apartment at the time, but they denied throwing anything, law-enforcement sources said.

A 911 call came from the same apartment, they said. But without someone identifying the attacker, it will be hard to make an arrest.

“It’s hard to not think about it all the time,” Aldrich said. “I just try to deal with it, but sometimes, I’ll get upset or angry.

“I’m not really the person to be like, ‘Why did this happen to me?’ I was in the wrong place at the wrong time,” she said.

Her mom, Amy Aldrich, praised her daughter’s bravery but said the past three months had been “really terrible” for the family.

“Just about every medical professional, when they see her legs, say, ‘Why hasn’t someone been caught?’ ” the mom said.

Crime Stoppers is offering a $2,500 reward for information on the assault. Anonymous calls may be made to (800) 577-TIPS.

By Ebony Bowden and Larry Celona

Pediatric endocrinologist explains ‘transgender therapy’ a danger to kids, based on ‘very poor science’

“These children are very much being harmed,”

Transgender Child Abuse

On Friday, the Democratically controlled House passed the so-called “Equality Act”, along with eight Republicans in support, which among other things adds sexual orientation and “gender identity” under the protections of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.Ditch the fake news ==> Click here to get news you can trust sent right to your inbox. It’s free!

This addition now goes to the Senate, where it faces a less certain future, but it brought up again a discussion that has been in the news a great deal this year, in a variety of forms.

Laura Ingraham on Friday spoke with Dr. Paul Hruz, a pediatric endocrinologist, specifically on gender identity and the incautious, largely experimental and, as he called them, “drastic” treatments being given to children, euphemistically referred to as transgender “therapy.”

The “therapy” is actually very serious, and in young children can leave lifelong harm.

Ingraham starts with the most obvious and utterly reasonable question. “I have a question after reading a lot about this,” she said. “Why is the medical community so afraid of considering the impact of hormone treatment, and surgeries and so forth, for the young?”

“It’s fairly important to recognize that what is being put forward with the goal of truly helping these individuals that are suffering is based on very, very poor science,” Hruz told Ingraham. “Any effort to draw attention to the poor science and the potential very negative and serious consequences that these hormonal interventions really has not been given the attention that it deserves.”

He added that this therapy is uniquely unquestioned, and dangers unexplored, as compared with normal medical science and research.

Listen below as Dr. Hruz explains that the physical and emotional development of adolescence and puberty are being ignored, or whether the questioning of gender identity in youth is a normal and passing process of development, for which a permanent harmful treatment would be a dramatic overcorrection or irreparable error.

It’s very important to note that Dr. Hruz doesn’t question the existence of gender dysphoria, or having a gender identity different from one’s biological sex. He didn’t speak ill of the legislation either. The reason that it’s important is because the reaction his statements will get, and that Ingraham will get for simply having covered the topic, will not care about that distinction.

The fact that he is even questioning the undertaking of serious intervention in the development of a child without thorough understanding of the consequences or even the necessity, won’t matter, because the politics of social justice are too rigid for even contemplation of caution. You must embrace and celebrate surgically altering children, or you’re the backward loon.

In other words, even if you are challenging the science with scientific data, the reaction will be of a social and political nature, not a similarly scientific one.

by CALEB HOWE

THE TRUE FACTS ABOUT THE STEM SCHOOL SHOOTING IN COLORADO. Failures By School Officials Just Like Parkland

On May 7th two students; Devon Erickson, 18, and Alec [Maya] McKinney, 16 opened fire at the STEM School – Highlands Ranch Colorado killing one student and injured eight others.

School Officials Warned:

  • One of the Colorado charter school shooting suspects “always joked” about massacring his classmates, a former student says. Devon Erickson, 18, “would whisper, like get really close and kinda put his arm around you, and whisper in your ear, ‘Don’t come to school tomorrow,’” explained the former student, Kevin Cole, in an interview with “Today.”
  • On Jan. 25, he apparently expressed his distaste for his classmates at STEM School Highlands Ranch, tweeting: “FUCK stem kids i swear to fucking god.”
  • On Feb. 21, he tweeted: “G-gun F-for the purpose of shooting myself.”
  • Officials at STEM School Highlands Ranch reportedly were warned five months before this week’s deadly attack of a “perfect storm” brewing on campus for “a repeat of Columbine.” Parents had been complaining about bullying, sexual assault and violence.
  • A parent told CNN that she was so concerned about the “pressure cooker” of violence, sexual assault and bullying at the Colorado school, she called to complain to a county school board member in December.
  • School district official Daniel Winsor then wrote to STEM’s administration, specifically mentioning the parent’s fears of “a repeat of Columbine,” the 1999 massacre just 7 miles from STEM, according to the letter obtained by CNN.

“Many students are suicidal and violent in school,” Winsor wrote, terming the concerns “very serious” and calling for an urgent investigation, according to CNN.

Obsessed With Dark Subjects:

Officers were on scene at a Highlands Ranch home believed to be linked to Erickson on Tuesday night. They towed a white Honda sedan with “Fuck society,” “666” and what looked like a pentagram spray-painted across it, according to local reports.

The Sexual Issues:

  • Authorities have been describing McKinney as a female juvenile named Maya
  • When McKinney appeared in court, attorney said he preferred the pronoun ‘he’
  • Friends have taken to McKinney’s Instagram to reveal he was suffering from mental health issues and ‘desperately needed’ help.

A report [The New Atlantis Journal] finds scarce scientific evidence to conclude that transgender people are “born” that way.

The 143-page paper, published in The New Atlantis Journal, combs through hundreds of studies in search of a causal, biological explanation for gender identity, but comes up empty.

“Likewise, the belief that gender identity is an innate, fixed human property independent of biological sex — so that a person might be a ‘man trapped in a woman’s body’ or a ‘woman trapped in a man’s body’ — is not supported by scientific evidence,” the report states.

  • The only long-term study of transgender outcomes concluded that “Male to Female” transsexuals retain male-pattern criminality, including crimes against women.

NOTE: Their biological based aggression does not change.

[Long-Term Follow-Up of Transsexual Persons Undergoing Sex Reassignment Surgery: Cohort Study in Sweden http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0016885%5D

  • The DSM-5 changed the listing of transgender to “gender dysphoria,” in 2013, it remains classified as a mental illness today.

The Statements Of International Experts:

Dr. Paul R. McHugh, the former psychiatrist-in-chief for Johns Hopkins Hospital current Distinguished Service Professor of Psychiatry states that Transgenderism is a mental disorder that merits treatment, that sex change is biologically impossible, and that people who promote sexual reassignment surgery are collaborating with and promoting a mental disorder.

“’Sex change’ is biologically impossible,” “People who undergo sex-reassignment surgery do not change from men to women or vice versa. Rather, they become feminized men or masculinized women. Claiming that this is civil-rights matter and encouraging surgical intervention is in reality to collaborate with and promote a mental disorder.”

Dr. Joseph Berger, has issued a statement saying that from a medical and scientific perspective there is no such thing as a “transgendered” person, and that terms such as “gender expression” and “gender identity” used in the bill are at the very least ambiguous, and are more an emotional appeal than a statement of scientific fact.

“The medical treatment of delusions, psychosis or emotional happiness is not surgery.”

Moreover, Dr. Berger stated that the arguments put forward by those advocating for special rights for gender confused people have no scientific value and are subjective and emotional appeals with no objective scientific basis.

Dr. Kenneth Zucker, long acknowledged as a foremost authority on gender identity issues in children, has also been a lifelong advocate for gay and transgender rights.

However, much to the consternation of adult transgender activists, Zucker believes that gender-dysphoric pre-pubertal children are best served by helping them align their gender identity with their anatomic sex. This view ultimately cost him his 30-year directorship of the Child Youth and Family Gender Identity Clinic (GIC) at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto.

  • While approximately 6.7 percent of the general United States population suffers from depression and 18 percent grapple with some iteration of an anxiety disorder, nearly half of all individuals who identify as transgender experience these issues.

What’s more, over 41 percent of trans men and women are estimated to have attempted suicide — a rate that’s nearly nine times as high as the rate of cisgender Americans.

NOTE: Social stigma has been shown to NOT be a factor in this.

  • A 2011 Swedish study, it looked at mortality and morbidity after gender reassignment surgery and found that people who changed genders had a higher risk of suicide.

In this study, all the sex-reassigned persons in Sweden from 1973–2003 (191 male-to-females, 133 female-to-males) were compared to a comparable random control group. The sex-reassigned persons had substantially higher rates of death from cardiovascular disease and suicide, and substantially higher rates of attempted suicide….Gender surgery is not effective treatment for depression, anxiety or mental disorders.

Transgender people have extremely high suicide rates, aggression, depression and anxiety disorder.  

Dr. Paul McHugh: Protecting Children and Society From Bad Ideas

In 1979 Dr. Paul McHugh closed the sex-change clinic at Johns Hopkins. In the ’80s he testified against phony ‘recovered memories.’ He hasn’t given up the fight.

You might have heard this joke: A man in a car gets a call from his wife. “Honey, be careful,” she says. “A car is going the wrong way on the highway.” He replies: “It’s not just one car. It’s hundreds of them!”

If it were a psychiatrist joke, Paul McHugh, 87, could be that driver. A professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and a tenacious skeptic of the crazes that periodically overtake his specialty, Dr. McHugh has often served as psychiatry’s most outspoken critic. Either he’s crazy, or all the other psychiatrists are.

The best-known, and most controversial, decision of his professional life is newly relevant—and recently reversed. In 1979, as psychiatrist in chief at Johns Hopkins Hospital, he shut down the Gender Identity Clinic, which performed sex-change operations. In his view, the hospital had “wasted scientific and technical resources and damaged our professional credibility by collaborating with madness rather than trying to study, cure, and ultimately prevent it,” as he wrote in 2004. In 2017 the clinic was reopened as the Center for Transgender Health, performing what it now calls “gender-affirming surgeries.” Its medical-office coordinator, Mellissa Noyes, told me “the demand is massive.”

Dr. McHugh is again on the outs with his profession. He doesn’t mind: “I’ve been there before,” he tells me as we sit in his book-laden Baltimore home, a white-brick American Moderne in the leafy Guilford neighborhood abutting Johns Hopkins, where he’s still a professor.

His contrarian roots runs deep. He was a diminutive boy in the 1940s, when psychoanalysts had popularized the notion that physical deficiencies—including short stature—produced inferiority complexes, especially in boys and men. He became a prime candidate for the experimental growth-hormone therapies rising to meet the demand from anxious parents. But Paul’s father, a schoolteacher, decided against the treatments recommended for his son. Shortness wouldn’t be the worst problem he’d have to face, the elder McHugh reasoned. As it turned out, the animal-derived pituitary treatments were ineffective; the human-derived form sometimes carried the infectious agent that causes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, an incurable degenerative brain disorder.

“I know my life would have been easier if I had had 4 or 5 more inches,” says Dr. McHugh, who now stands 5-foot-6. But his childhood experience taught him a lesson that helped make him a giant in his field: Sometimes psychiatry’s cure is far worse than the disease.

Dr. McHugh believes psychiatrists’ first order of business ought to be to determine whether a mental disorder is generated by something the patient has (a disease of the brain), something the patient is (“overly extroverted” or “cognitively subnormal”), something a patient is doing (behavior such as self-starvation), or something a patient has encountered(a traumatic or otherwise disorienting experience). Practitioners too often practice what he calls “DSM checklist psychiatry”—matching up symptoms from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders with the goal of achieving diagnosis—rather than inquiring deeply into the sources and nature of an affliction.

“I came into psychiatry with the perception that it had not matured as a clinical science in which rational practices are directed by information on the causes and mechanisms of the disorders,” Dr. McHugh says. “Every other medical discipline has that.” He still regards psychiatry as badly in need of “organizing principles.”

That’s putting it mildly. Psychiatry has fallen under the sway of a dizzying number of crazes. They include imagined ailments like hystero-epilepsy, in which people who didn’t have epilepsy supposedly acquired symptoms from those who did—and conditions exacerbated by mental-health professionals, like anorexia nervosa and post-traumatic stress disorder. Treatment has often been grotesque—think frontal lobotomies, insulin shock therapy and primitive chemically induced seizure therapies.

Psychiatric enthusiasm has also led to gross miscarriages of justice. In the 1980s, Dr. McHugh became a leading opponent of so-called recovered-memory therapy, in which psychoanalysts claimed to have discovered the latent source of patients’ multiple-personality disorder. Dr. McHugh believes multiple-personality disorder is a phony ailment and recovered memories are iatrogenic—a Greek word meaning “brought on by the healer”—implanted by the therapeutic process that purports to discover them. Often the fake memories were of childhood abuse, and Dr. McHugh traveled to Rockville, Md.; Manchester, N.H.; Providence, R.I.; and Appleton, Wis., offering expert testimony to exonerate wrongfully accused defendants.

Given all this, does psychiatry have anything of value to offer? “I think it really has helped demonstrate that mental illnesses are real things . . . that need to be studied, and can be treated,” Dr. McHugh says. “I think that’s a tremendous achievement.”

But what are those “real things,” and how should psychiatrists treat them? Those are critical questions for a field that routinely administers powerful medications and sometimes recommends life-altering surgery, while the relationship between the brain and its elusive alter-ego, the mind, remains largely mysterious.

Dr. McHugh argues that the treatment of returning soldiers for the liberally applied PTSD diagnosis is another example of iatrogenesis. Such diagnoses are far rarer among Israel Defense Forces veterans, who experience plenty of trauma. Israelis “know that you can get a terrible psychological reaction out of a traumatic battle. And they do take the soldiers out, and they tell them the following: ‘This is perfectly normal; you need to be out of battle for a while. Don’t think that this is a disease that’s going to hurt you, this is like grief. You’re going to get over it, it’s normal. And within a few weeks, after a little rest, we’re going to put you back with your comrades and you’re going to go back to work.’ And they all do.”

By contrast, American psychiatrists say: “ ‘You’ve had a permanent wound. You’re going to be on disability forever. And this country has mistreated you by putting you in a false war.’ They make chronic invalids of them. That’s the difference.”

Dr. McHugh graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1957, when many of the brightest aspiring psychiatrists poured their energy into psychoanalysis. During his psychiatry internship at Boston’s Peter Bent Brigham Hospital (now part of Brigham and Women’s Hospital), the chief of psychiatry gave Dr. McHugh a bit of advice that set the course for his professional life: If you want to make a real contribution to psychiatry, avoid psychoanalysis and study the brain.

Dr. McHugh spent the next six years training under some of the world’s best neurologists, starting at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he met his wife, Jean, a British social worker visiting the U.S. on a Fulbright scholarship. It isn’t hard to imagine what she saw in the brilliant young neurology intern, a nice Catholic boy with courtly manners and aquamarine eyes like sea glass.

He focused his research on the physiology of appetite—the brain’s regulation of food intake. He eventually discovered and named two receptors for the digestive hormone cholecystokinin. He wrote 162 academic papers, and the National Academy of Sciences credits him with being the first to “describe increased cortisol secretion associated with depression, an accomplishment that led to the development of a test to identify serious depression by physical means.” This work taught him how to conduct rigorous scientific inquiry—and led him to believe many psychiatrists weren’t engaged in it.

In 1975 Johns Hopkins hired him as director of its Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science and the hospital’s chief psychiatrist. Hopkins was famous for pioneering sex-reassignment surgery: In the 1991 film “The Silence of the Lambs,” Dr. Hannibal Lecter, played by Anthony Hopkins, refers to Johns Hopkins as one of the “three major centers for transsexual surgery.”

As department head, Dr. McHugh encouraged a colleague to conduct follow-up research on patients who had undergone sex-change operations. The results disturbed him. Although most of the patients “were reasonably satisfied with the change, they hadn’t any improvement in any of their psychosocial issues that were the whole reason for doing it in the first place.”

Worse, some of the patients became “suicidal and depressed and regretful.” There was not enough good evidence to determine before the fact which candidates for surgery would fall into either group. With no way to predict which patients would be hurt by the operations, Dr. McHugh decided he could not allow them to continue. He says shuttering the clinic was a matter of adhering to the Hippocratic Oath and the scientific obligation to ground conclusions in empirical evidence.

“Everybody should agree” that sex-reassignment surgery is “an experiment right now,” he says. “We’re doing an experiment. We have lots of publications that are telling us that the evidence base for these treatments is very low-quality.” There are “not enough subjects, not enough good results—not enough anything. Not enough comparisons . . . that would make it evidence-based.” He says the Institutional Review Board should oversee all such surgery. It doesn’t.

Dr. McHugh believes the Johns Hopkins clinic’s reopening was motivated by economic and political factors, not scientific evidence. The complicated operations are big moneymakers for hospitals. That the new department’s name uses the politically correct designation “transgender,” not the clinical term “gender dysphoria,” and refers to the surgeries as “gender affirming,” seems to support the view that the doctors have formally embraced transgender ideology.

Dr. McHugh does not believe surgery cures gender dysphoria. He thinks that condition, along with anorexia and body dysmorphia, is a “disorder of assumption,” characterized by an “overvalued idea,” or a ruling passion that “fulminates in the mind of the subject, growing more dominant over time, more refined, and more resistant to challenge,” as he has written.

In the case of anorexia, the overvalued idea is that it’s good to be thin. The primary goal of the psychiatrist ought to be to help the patient change behavior. The prevailing standard of care for sufferers of gender dysphoria—“affirmative care”—is the opposite: It calls for mental-health professionals to accept both a patient’s self-diagnosis of gender dysphoria and the corresponding behavior.

The possibility that Dr. McHugh is wrong doesn’t trouble him. “Either the plastic surgeons and the transgender psychiatrists are right and I’m wrong—and if that’s the case, they will have done a lot of good by opposing me, and I will have been a drag on the system—or the opposite. Suppose they’re wrong and I’m right? They will have mutilated thousands of children, and I will look good. Who do you think is sleeping better at night?”

In fact, both parties seem to be sleeping fine—separately. Most current Johns Hopkins medical students, Dr. McHugh says, won’t talk to him. “They think that my views must be motivated by hatred,” he says, sounding baffled.

Dr. McHugh says he never went looking for these fights, but that’s not entirely credible. He is animated, even joyous, when assailing his opponents. If doctors can claim to have a professional calling, this has been his: to rail against what he considers the foolhardy passions of his profession, steering straight for the eye of the storm.

He quotes from the final stanza of Matthew Arnold’s poem “The Last Word”: “Charge once more, then, and be dumb! / Let the victors, when they come, / When the forts of folly fall, / Find thy body by the wall.” The lines speak of a tension between the impulse toward righteous opposition and the knowledge that there is also a time to surrender.

Dr. McHugh turns 88 later this month. For a moment, he seems to consider abandoning the fight. Perhaps he guesses what I’m thinking. Perhaps it occurs to him that his adversaries will read this article. He says, “I hope I’m still standing when these forts fall.”

Ms. Shrier is a writer living in Los Angeles.

Are Far-Right Extremist Crimes Rising? No

Truth Hate Crimes in the U.S.

Recently, President Trump said he doesn’t believe white nationalism is a growing problem—and at home in the U.S., he’s right.

The problem isn’t growing. It’s never subsided.

“There has been a steady rate of far-right extreme crimes since at least 1970, when we started collecting data,” said Michael Jensen, a senior researcher at START, the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism at the University of Maryland.  “What has changed is the emphasis on reporting far-right extremism. It produces the perception that there is a new increase. It’s not true.”

Strictly speaking, far-right terrorism has gone up, Dr. Jensen said—eight fatal attacks occurred in 2014 and seven in 2017 after decades of no more than three a year—but the broader class of extremist crimes, which includes terrorism, hate crimes and mixed motive crimes, has not.

START’s Global Terrorism Database, used to produce the State Department’s annual terrorism report for Congress, documents 180,000 attacks world-wide from 1970 forward.

Because it includes only premeditated attacks committed with the explicit purpose of promoting an ideology, its numbers are smaller than some other data sets.

One of the most sweeping is the U.S. Extremist Crime Database, a collection of violent and financial crimes committed by political extremists in the U.S. from 1990 forward—and it’s the persistence of far-right ideology this data reflects that alarms experts.

“The most striking thing is the resilience of the threat,” said Joshua D. Freilich, a professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York and co-director of the Extremist Crime Database. “It’s consistent in terms of the level of activity.”

Since 1990, far-right extremists have killed 477 people in 214 attacks in the U.S., according to the crime data. A majority of the assaults targeted minorities, with 241 people dying in 170 attacks. (In the same period, the Global Terrorism Database records 31 far-right attacks with one or more deaths.)History of Violence Fatal events in the U.S., by attacker typeSource: Joshua D. Freilich, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

“We haven’t seen a year since 1990 with no far-right homicides,” said Jeff Gruenewald, a professor at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis who studies domestic terrorism and extremism.

U.S. crimes by Islamist extremists have tended to be deadlier than far-right crimes, but they have also been more sporadic. Since 1990, Islamist extremists have conducted 50 assaults killing 3,148 people, a figure that includes 2,997 9/11 victims.

Homicides by far-left extremists, whose attacks peaked in the 1970s, are now uncommon.

The crime database, which is funded by the Department of Homeland Security, assembles records from legal documents, news accounts, watchdog groups and other publicly available sources. To be included, the crimes must have been committed for ideological reasons.

The database defines far-right extremists as fiercely nationalistic; anti-global; suspicious of federal authority; reverent of individual liberties, especially the right to own guns and be free of taxes; believing in conspiracy theories; and, in some cases, antagonistic toward specific racial or religious groups. The mainstream conservative movement and the mainstream Christian right are not included.

Islamist extremists are defined as rejecting the traditional Muslim respect for Christians and Jews; believing Islamic law should be forcibly implemented; believing the U.S. supports the humiliation of Islam; holding all Americans responsible for government actions; and endorsing violence against those they deem corrupt.

Based on these definitions, the crime database includes the 2015 San Bernardino, Calif., shooting, where a married couple killed 14 county employees at a holiday gathering after one spouse pledged allegiance to the leader of the Islamic State terrorist group on Facebook.

It also includes the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing that occurred when an antigovernment militant detonated a truck packed with explosives outside the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, killing 168 people.

But it excludes the 2017 Las Vegas shooting, where a gunman killed 58 people at an outdoor music festival, because there was no clear evidence that ideology motivated the killer.

The Global Terrorism Database treats each of these events the same way. But it leaves out unpremeditated hate crimes such as the 1998 murder of James Byrd Jr., a black man who was chained behind a truck and dragged for 2 miles by three white supremacists.

A third data set, Profiles of Individual Radicalization in the United States, or PIRUS, examines extremists in an effort to deduce when, and how, they were radicalized.

The data, which is also assembled by START, includes 2,148 violent and nonviolent individuals who committed ideologically motivated crimes in the U.S. or who associated with domestic or foreign extremist organizations from 1948 through 2017.

Far-right extremists are the largest ideological group in the database, accounting for 43% of the entries. Islamists account for 23%.

PIRUS shows radicalization occurring in waves. The latest wave of far-right radicalization began in the 1980s and continues today.

“It’s not a brand new thing,” Dr. Jensen said. “It’s certainly a very real national security concern right now, but it’s something we’ve dealt with for quite some time.”

By Jo Craven McGinty

An Insult To Female Athletes

The state of Connecticut has offered a dismaying picture of the future of female athletics, with two male-to-female transgender runners routinely outpacing the competition at the state track championships.

The two biologically male students, Terry Miller and Andraya Yearwood, finished first and second, respectively, in the 55-meter dash this year, crushing the competition. Miller set a new girls ­indoor record and also won the 300-meter. The year before, the two finished first and second in the 100-meter state outdoor championships.

Connecticut allows students to compete in sports as the gender they identify as, with no further requirements. If fashionable opinion has anything to say about it, this will be the universal trend.

Everyone is supposed to ignore the madness of it. In sports, the supposed fluidity of gender runs up against the ineluctability of sex.

Testosterone, which males get massive doses of beginning at ­puberty, is the original performance-enhancing drug. It makes men bigger, stronger and faster. It is easier for them to add muscle mass. They have bigger hearts (physically, not metaphorically, of course) and greater lung capacity, among other physical advantages.

This accounts for the considerable male-female gap in athletic performance. “This differential isn’t the result of boys and men having a male identity, more ­resources, better training or superior discipline,” Doriane Lambelet Coleman and Wickliffe Shreve of Duke Law School have written. “It’s because they have an androgenized body.”

At the 1988 Olympics, Florence Griffith-Joyner established a women’s record of 10.49 seconds in the 100-meter dash that no one has come close to touching ever since (in fact, there are unfounded suspicions that she was using a performance-enhancing drug).

Her epic sprint was ho-hum for a male. According to the International Association of Athletics Federations, there were 15 men in the United States whose best time was 10.49 in the 100-meter in 2018, and they were merely tied for 217th fastest last year.

Worldwide, there were 35 men whose best was at that time, all tied for 768th fastest in 2018.

This is why we have separate ­female and male competitions to begin with, so women can showcase their bodies and get recognition without being overshadowed by men with inherent physiological advantages. This common-sense reason for separate competitions and separate record books is now falling away.

The Olympic committee has dropped a requirement for sex-reassignment surgery for transgender athletes, and it has set a maximum level of testosterone for transgendered women that’s still high for biological females. Even if biologically male athletes get their testosterone levels down, their bodies are still different.

A former Olympic volleyball player from Brazil, Ana Paula Henkel, made this point in an open letter opposing the new Olympic policy. “This rushed and heedless decision to include biological men, born and built with testosterone, with their height, their strength and aerobic capacity of men, is beyond the sphere of tolerance,” Henkel wrote. “It represses, embarrasses, humiliates and excludes women.”

She cited the example of Brazilian player who formerly competed as a man and now dominates in the women’s league and will probably make the 2020 women’s Olympic team (and deny a spot to a female player who doesn’t have the build of a man).

It now takes courage to raise any such objections. Feminists in good standing the day before yesterday are getting ostracized for insisting that there are differences between men and women that matter and can’t be ignored or wished away.

When the tennis great Martina Navratilova wrote against biological men competing in women’s sports, she was roundly attacked as transphobic and swiftly booted from the board of the LGBT group Athlete Ally. Former Olympic swimmer Sharron Davies, from Britain, got mobbed for expressing similar sentiments.

We live in an age when stating the obvious is forbidden, and women’s sport may never be quite the same again.

By Rich Lowry