Tag Archives: bed bugs

#TravelAlert Bed Bugs Have Just Been Found On A Business Class Flight & You Should Be Afraid

Travel Dale Yeager Blog

Here’s some scary news that should make your next trip a very uncomfortable one.

Bed bugs were recently found on the business class seats of an Air India flight from Newark Liberty International Airport in the U.S to India.

Reports from Fox5NY joined outraged business class passengers who took to Twitter to express their anger and disgust at the airline. The passengers revealed that their seats were infested with bed bugs, causing them to have “bites all over their body” once they landed.

Whilst some may argue that it’s an isolated case since they’d probably never travel to India, there’s still the concern of how the bed bugs got there in the first place and whether or not they’re in the airport (likely).

Another major question raised is how often these plane seats get cleaned.

Pravin Tonsekar@pat_tons

@airindiain @sureshpprabhu @narendramodi_in Suresh Prabhuji – just arrived from New York on Air India 144 business class with family . All our seats infested with bed bugs . Sir , have heard of bed bugs on trains but shocked to experience on our maharaja and that too business

6:25 AM – Jul 17, 2018

And the aftermath…

Saumya Shetty@saumshetty

What an #airindia #businessclass would do to you? AI still has to get in touch with me inspite if my repeated attempts to get in touch with them. @airindiain @NewYorkTimes11 @cnni

9:12 AM – Jul 20, 2018

One passenger even raised a good point after his children were fed to the blood sucking critters.

Rohan@roscrow

@airindiain my wife and three kids flex business class AI 144 from Newark to mumbai; now they have bed bug bites all over their body; is this is what we paid $10,000 for???

1:50 PM – Jul 19, 2018 · Montville, NJ

Kashmira Tonsekar who was a passenger on the flight told The Hindustan Times that they had alerted the crew of the situation who then sprayed a repellant.

“After a while, more bugs started coming out from that and other seats.”

Air India have since come out to address the issue via a statement saying that it is “deeply concerned with a few reports of ‘bugs’ causing inconvenience to its esteemed passengers”.

“The issue has been viewed seriously and every possible step is being taken to closely inspect and further strengthen our system at every level to ensure that such isolated incidents of passenger discomfiture do not affect our consistent performance.”

Does this bode well with your faith in business class? Let us know.

by 

How to Avoid Bringing Home Bed Bugs

Travel Dale Yeager Blog

Bed bugs are bed bad. People’s entire lives have been overturned by these (increasingly common) blood-sucking, itch-inducing pests. Thankfully, they’re not disease vectors, but I would rather not share my home with a roommate who wants to eat me, thank you very much.

Scientists have noticed an expansion in bed bug cases across the world, in no small part due to increased international travel. But one team wanted to know how the bed bugs managed to hitch a ride, and how to prevent the spread. It turns out that part of the answer lies with the dirty laundry inside your travel bag.

“There are a lot of good studies out there focused on trying to understand how bed bugs are attracted to humans and how they get around apartment blocks, but no one has really talked about how they get into the house in the first place,” study author William Hentley from the University of Sheffield in the UK told Gizmodo. “Stopping people from bringing bed bugs home can be a big step in preventing them spreading throughout the world.”

Scientists already know that human odor attracts bed bugs, though not which chemicals in the odor specifically. But for the newest study, researchers prepared a mock bedroom with laundry bags containing clean and dirty clothes—in other words, there were no humans in the room. The critters were “twice as likely to aggregate on bags containing soiled clothes compared to bags containing clean clothes,” according to the paper published today in the journal Scientific Reports. Contrary to the researchers’ hypothesis, the amount of carbon dioxide in the room did not affect their results—the CO2 source would represent a human, since some bugs like mosquitos are specifically attracted to the carbon dioxide you exhale.

These results were enough to convince the researchers that bed bugs could travel throughout the world by hitching a ride in luggage containing dirty clothes.

As a caveat, this was an experimental room and not real life, said both Hentley and Toby Fountain, an evolutionary biologist from the University of Uppsala in Sweden who was not involved in the study. But still, said Fountain, the authors “demonstrate a striking pattern that bags containing clothes with human odor were more frequently used as refuges than those without. This result emphases the importance of making sure luggage and other belongings are made as inaccessible to bed bugs as possible when staying in increased risk places, for example by making sure bags are fully closed and secured and kept away from the bed.” Hentley agreed with this advice.

So there you have it. When traveling to possibly bed bug-contaminated locations—like, say, that sketchy-seeming hotel—keep your luggage on metal racks (bed bugs don’t like crawling on metal, said Hentley) or put your whole suitcase in a plastic bag to avoid picking up the horrors that are bed bugs.

TRAVEL ALERT: Is your city crawling with bed bugs? To 20 Cities in the U.S.

Bed Bugs Travel
Bed Bugs Travel

Baltimore may want to omit its latest superlative from the tourist brochure: The city with the most bedbug treatments.

Orkin ranked the city atop its annual Top 50 Bed Bug Cities List, a ranking of metro areas based on the number of bed bug treatments the pest control company performed. This year’s list, released Tuesday, is based on visits from Dec. 1, 2015 to Nov. 30, 2016.

The nation’s capitol, Washington, D.C., came in second followed by Chicago and New York.

The pests are starting to become a real problem, said Ron Harrison, Orkin entomologist and director of technical services. And they aren’t limited to mammoth metropolises. Mid-sized cities in the South, Midwest, West Coast and even Hawaii made this year’s top 50 list. In fact, nearly all of the nation’s pest professionals have had to deal with the little buggers.

“We have more people affected by bed bugs in the United States now than ever before,” Harrison said. “They were virtually unheard of in the U.S. 10 years ago.”

But bed bugs aren’t evidence of poor hygiene or cleanliness, Harrison explained. Anyone can get them. All they need is blood to survive and they’re also good travelers, often latching onto luggage, purses and other items during travel. Besides bedrooms, the critters are spotted at movie theaters, in public transportation, offices and libraries.

“We have treated bed bugs in everything from million-dollar homes to public housing,” Harrison said.

Bed bugs are hard to spot. At full growth, they’re the size of an apple seed. The first signs of an infestation are the bugs themselves or the small dark stains they leave.

Here’s how you can combat bed bugs:

– Inspect your home, especially around the bed. Decrease clutter. inspect furniture before it enters your home and dry linens on high heat.

– Survey hotel rooms while traveling. Peek in hiding spots in the mattress, box spring and other furniture. Keep luggage away from the wall. Examine your luggage while repacking and place dryer-safe clothing in the dryer on the highest setting when arriving home.

– If you suspect an infestation, call a pest management professional.

The top 20 on Orkin’s Bed Bug Cities List:

  1. Baltimore,
  2. Washington, D.C.
  3. Chicago,
  4. New York
  5. Columbus, Ohio
  6. Los Angeles
  7. Detroit
  8. Cincinnati
  9. Philadelphia
  10. San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose, Calif.
  11. Richmond-Petersburg, Va.
  12. Raleigh-Durham, N.C.
  13. Cleveland-Akron-Canton, Ohio
  14. Indianapolis
  15. Dallas-Ft. Worth, Texas
  16. Atlanta
  17. Houston
  18. Buffalo, N.Y.
  19. Charlotte, N.C.
  20. Norfolk-Portsmouth-Newport News, Va.

Sean Rossman , USA TODAY