Tag Archives: Dale Yeager profiler

Addiction: Women, Compulsive Behavior and the New Wine Mom

“Pride and ego are what keeps people locked into addiction”

  • Alcohol-related­ deaths for white women ages 35–54 have more than doubled.

We naturally want to feel good. But what happens when our favorite method of stress relief becomes destructive?

Serious addictions take an undeniable toll both physically and mentally. But according to Lisa Boucher, author of “Raising the Bottom: Making Mindful Choices in a Drinking Culture,” the 2017 winner of the Best Book Award for women’s health, people often overlook the true root of addictive behavior: a wounded spirit.

Addiction is a spiritual malady,” said Boucher, a registered nurse who has helped women overcome alcoholism for the past 28 years. “People are just trying to fill the hole of the soul.”

Most addiction counselors acknowledge the spiritual aspect of their clients’ compulsion. “The Big Book” of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), for example, emphasizes a spiritual awakening as a necessary step in breaking free from alcohol’s grip.

But it’s a notoriously hard lesson to learn. A common theme among the hundreds of addicts Boucher has worked with is that they can take years or decades to even admit they have a problem.

“Pride and ego are what keeps people locked into addiction,” she said. “They don’t want to accept that they can’t control something.”

The New Alcoholic

We’re all prone to occasional indulgence, but we can be lax at judging when we’ve gone too far. Substance abuse can be even harder to accept when society supports it. Unlike heroin or cocaine, alcohol is a legal and socially encouraged drug. But Boucher says these features can make it even more insidious. She points to an increasingly common character: the wine mom.

“We have normalized alcoholism,” Boucher said. “The new alcoholic carries a diaper bag and wears designer pumps.”

While recreational drug use, in general, is at an all-time high, alcohol remains the most abused drug in the world after tobacco, and it’s hitting women especially hard. Alcohol-related­ deaths for white women ages 35–54 have more than doubled since 1999, according to an analysis of federal data by The Washington Post. Researchers studying the spike call it a public health crisis.

According to a 2013 study, the alcohol industry has increased ad spending almost 400 percent since 1971. Ads make a brief nod toward “drinking responsibly,” but the predominant message is that booze is a fun, sophisticated, and socially sanctioned excuse for letting go.

It’s an appealing proposal, especially for those trying to juggle a career and family. But Boucher believes women have become so conditioned to reach for a drink under stress, that they lose touch with their innate coping skills.

“People drink because they can’t handle the way they feel,” Boucher said. “If you’re trying to change the way you feel, you’re not coping with some deeper emotion.”

It’s not just alcohol; all of our most destructive drugs tend to be those that provide a temporary escape from misery. Such substances can be a short-term blessing for serious injuries and illness. But we lose an important part of ourselves when they become our primary coping method.

Chronic reliance on a substance for our sense of well-being can stunt our emotional and spiritual growth, says Boucher, because we never develop the strength of character that comes from facing life’s challenges with a clear mind. A prime example is Boucher’s sister, a successful career woman in her 50s who’s four years sober of a serious meth habit.

“This is a woman who never learned to cope with life,” Boucher said. “She has had to go back and relearn how to deal with conflict in an appropriate manner.”

Researchers point to genetic markers that may increase the risk for addiction, but role modeling may seal the deal. Boucher and her siblings grew up resentful of their alcoholic mother who was either in a Valium stupor or drunk for most of their childhood, yet they all followed a similar path.

“Our mother never taught us coping skills,” Boucher said.

Spiritual Disease

Why would anyone choose to waste money, destroy relationships, and ruin their health? Addiction doesn’t make any logical sense, but we can’t seem to stop the tide. Despite the government spending more than $1 trillion on the war on drugs over the past four decades, the rates of addiction and overdose deaths in the United States are now higher than ever before. Opioids get the most attention, but in some states, meth may soon claim the highest number of addicts and overdose deaths.

Addiction used to apply primarily to substances. Today, it is found with vices such as pornography, gambling, shopping, excessive smartphone use, and countless other compulsive pleasures.

Researchers believe they may soon uncover a physical fix to our addiction epidemic. Studies are underway to develop treatments that target the chemical imbalances and faulty wiring found in the brains of addicts.

But what if our addiction problem is more complex than any solution science can conjure?

Spirit is a concept that is often at odds with contemporary medicine, but it wasn’t always this way. People once looked for meaning in their suffering.

Of course, each addict has a unique backstory of trauma and pain.

Medicating Addiction

Since people usually do drugs to feel better, there’s a prevailing notion that substance abuse is merely a symptom of depression. But Boucher believes that’s a backward idea.

“You can’t diagnose depression when they’re smoking pot every day, drinking alcohol, using meth, smoking crack, taking opioids, or whatever that person’s drug of choice is,” she said. “How do you know what that person’s baseline is?”

Alcohol, for example, is a depressant. So, if a heavy drinker complains of depression, they may be guzzling the root cause.

Boucher is sympathetic to legitimate cases of depression, but she believes that in order to properly diagnose it, sobriety should come first. In her experience, those who go clean for three to six months often eliminate their need for drug treatment.

“In 90 percent of the cases that I’ve worked with, these women were able to get off their antidepressants,” she said.

Beyond Willpower

Few people can drop their bad habits cold turkey. But for many addicts, connecting to something larger than themselves helps them work toward recovery. However, adopting this mindset can be a difficult leap, especially since those who turn to drugs often do so because their faith in God or man has been shattered.

For those resistant to talk of a higher power, Heller suggests more deity-neutral language.

“One could say that the person needs to be able to expand their consciousness to incorporate new ideas,” she said, “but in order for anyone to engage in a process of healing and self-exploration, they have to be able to surrender to something greater than their own will.”

Some insist willpower is the key to recovery—if we’re determined to deny our cravings for long enough, we can be whole again. But according to Kimberly Hershenson, a New York-based therapist specializing in substance abuse, willpower will always fall short.

“If you’re looking at this from a disease model, you are as powerless over addiction as you are with cancer,” Hershenson said. “No matter what you try to do, your brain is going to crave more. And it’s really about accepting that.”

Our addictive impulses are connected to the survival and pleasure centers of our brain, so they react faster and with greater force than the part of our brain responsible for reasoning. This means that cravings surge long before thoughts of consequence kick in. Beating back urges can be a losing battle even for the strongest of wills.

“An addict cannot force themselves into a place of health by soldiering through life,” Heller said. “This is about being willing, not being willful.”

If addiction is a spiritual disease, then the cure has to come from within. There are tools to address the physical aspects of addiction, but experts say we must also cultivate positive behaviors, such as humility, accountability, a sense of purpose, and healthy coping mechanisms.

Life can be cruel, the world can seem crazy, but how we handle it makes all the difference. Boucher urges us to step back, be thankful for what we have, and reconnect with what is essential to our souls.

“We are human beings. We need quiet. We need to reflect. We need to nurture the whole person,” she said.

BY CONAN MILNER

ALERT! DOJ Summit on Child Sex Trafficking: Mothers as Pimps, Suburban families and lazy Social Services

(L-R) Barbara Amaya, sex trafficking survivor, Erica MacDonald, U.S. Attorney for the District of Minnesota, and Barbara Jean Wilson, sex trafficking survivor, at the Summit on Combating Human Trafficking at the Department of Justice in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

Barbara Jean Wilson was 8 years old when she was first trafficked. Her mother was the pimp.

“Instead of me going out, she would bring the men home,” Wilson said during a trafficking summit at the Justice Department on Jan. 14.

“I was fed drugs. I was fed alcohol. The one time that I had the courage to say ‘No,’ one of them put a gun to my head and said, ‘No one tells me no.’”

Wilson said she would plead with her mother for it to stop, but was told that’s how the rent was getting paid.

“And so I had nowhere to seek help and I just dealt with it. That’s how I lived,” she said.

Wilson was eventually thrown out of her home, and to survive, she got deeper into drugs and did the only thing she knew—sell her body.

By 15, she had a daughter to support. At around 17, Wilson overdosed on drugs, and ironically, that’s what she said saved her.

“The Holy Spirit came to me and said, ‘Enough is enough,” she said. “And I made a promise to God that if he got me through it, I would spend the rest of my life sharing my story to help other victims … [and] bring understanding and  awareness to those who don’t know what we go through.”

She’s been doing so ever since, but the pain is still evident. Despite what her mother put her through, she said she has forgiven her.

“She asked for forgiveness. I forgave her. I forgave my abusers. … In order for me to go forth, I had to forgive,” she said. “But it damaged me in a lot of ways, damaged me in so many ways.”

Epoch Times Photo
Barbara Jean Wilson, sex trafficking survivor, at a human trafficking event at the Department of Justice in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

Homelessness and Trafficking

Bill Bedrossian, CEO of Covenant House in California, said his organization is the largest provider for homeless youth in the United States.

“And by default, we’ve become the largest provider of housing for victims of human trafficking,” he said. “For a lot of these young people, they literally have begun being trafficked at 8, 9 years old by their family members, by the gangs, by the street life that they’ve been exposed to.”

A recent study conducted by Covenant House found that 20 percent of young people who experience homelessness are sex trafficked, Bedrossian said.

He said he has noticed a change over the past five to 10 years in both the sophistication of the traffickers and the insidiousness of the crime.

Kay Duffield, executive director of the Northern Virginia Human Trafficking Initiative, said that in about 84 percent of sex trafficking cases, the trafficker uses the internet to sell their victims.

“One sex buyer said that buying sex was as easy as going online and ordering a pizza,” she said.

‘Traffickers Are Predators’

Barbara Amaya grew up in Fairfax, Virginia, in a home she said looked beautiful on the outside, but wasn’t on the inside.

Amaya said she was abused and ended up going through “all the systems,” including child welfare, foster care, and juvenile justice. By 12, she was a habitual runaway.

“I wasn’t just running away, I was running to find something,” she said. “And traffickers are predators. They prey upon the vulnerable.”

One day she was approached by a young woman at Dupont Circle in Washington, who suggested she come home with her to get food.

“She took me back to her place. And there was her boyfriend, who was actually her trafficker,” Amaya said. “They started training me for purposes of prostitution. I was 12 years old.”

Soon after, she was sold to a man who took her to New York and trafficked her out with other minors he had bought from all over the country.

“He had many other young people in different hotels around New York. He had two apartments in Manhattan on either side—East Side, West Side, and he would move everybody all around all the time to keep everyone off balance and isolated in that world,” she said.

Her trafficker became violent if she didn’t bring in enough money.

“He would beat me with a wire coat hanger … throw me down the stairs, throw me out of a car,” Amaya said.

“The violence occurred in his hands and also at the buyer’s hands. I’ve been shot, I’ve been stabbed. I’ve been everything that you could probably think of—or not think of. When someone thinks they’re buying you, they think they can do whatever they want to do to you.”

Epoch Times Photo
Barbara Amaya, sex trafficking survivor, at the Summit on Combating Human Trafficking at the Department of Justice in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Samira Bouaou/The Epoch Times)

At around 15 or 16, Amaya was hooked on heroin and in Rikers Island prison. She broke out of the brainwashing fog long enough to tell the authorities her real name and age and asked them to call her parents. They came back and said her parents were on their way.

“I had all this flood of emotions because I’d been gone for so many years and I don’t know what they told my parents. I had shame, horrible shame—this is all my fault,” she recalled.

“I opened the door to the room. And I walked into the room, and it was my trafficker standing there.”

Amaya said she still doesn’t know how her trafficker knew to be there. But she was desperate for a heroin fix and left with him, missing her parents by 10 minutes. It put her back into the life for another seven years.

“[The drugs] numbed my brain and my body to the existence that I was suffering. So by the time I was 23, 24, I’m five foot nine, 99 pounds, probably going to die. I knew that,” she said. “I knew I had to do something and I pulled myself into a drug clinic over on the Lower East Side.”

She recalled vividly how the receptionist treated her “like a human being.”

“She cared. I felt like I mattered. I don’t remember feeling like that, maybe ever,” Amaya said. “And because of her, taking time out of her day to treat me like a human being, she propelled me out of New York City.”

Getting Out

Wilson said victims of sex trafficking should know they can get out and go on to live a productive life.

“Don’t be ashamed of what you were put through, because you’re not to blame,” she said. “That is not the life that anyone should have to live. And especially a child.

“When you see those young girls and those young boys out there on the street, they’re not out there because they want to be. They’re out there because they have no place to go. They don’t trust anyone.”

Bedrossian said a common thread in homeless and trafficked youth is that they crave love and belonging.

“We all long for significance in our lives,” he said. “The No. 1 deterrent from a young person to become trafficked is having a meaningful relationship, positive relationship with an adult in their life.”

BY CHARLOTTE CUTHBERTSON

9 ways thieves steal your identity – and how you can stop them

Dale Yeager Profiler Blog

Identity theft isn’t just someone stealing your credit card. Criminals are coming up with plenty of innovative ways to rip us off. New account fraud, a tactic in which someone opens an account in your name, is on the rise. So are cases of hackers using clever social engineering tactics to fool victims into giving up sensitive information.

Think it can’t happen to you? 

One recent example is a new type of identity fraud that tricks victims into thinking they’ve received a two-factor authentication text from their bank. This is especially shocking as it looks so real. 

More than 14 million Americans fell victim to identity theft in 2018, according to a 2019 study by Javelin Strategy & Research. Fraud is still rampant and can cause serious financial damage — not to mention all the time and effort it can take to undo it.

That’s why knowing the tactics thieves to steal your identity is essential. Avoid these pitfalls and stay protected.

1. Think before you share

We live in a generation of oversharing. People have been oversharing the details of their personal lives on reality TV shows for years.

These days, it seems everyone shares everything on social media platforms like Facebook. It’s often innocent oversharing, like your friend who “checks in” to every restaurant so you always know where she is and what she’s eating. Tap or click to secure your Facebook account once and for all.

Unfortunately, it’s easy to overshare with hackers, too. How often do you mindlessly click through buttons that say “Allow Access?” If you’re playing an online game or entering a contest, it’s understandable because you want a chance to win.

RELATED: Not sure who to turn to for tech help? I’ve got your back. 12 questions about social media you’re too embarrassed to ask.

But stop and think about what you’re doing before you give away your information. Take a second to read terms and conditions before you agree online, and be smart about what you post on the web.

You should never post your address, phone number or other personal information on social media sites. Platforms like Facebook are too careless with our privacy as it is, and you don’t want your sensitive information in the wrong hands.

2. Blast from the past

Remember MySpace accounts? From about 2005 to 2008 it was the most popular social media site in the world. Not so much anymore. Most MySpace users have moved on. Unfortunately, many forgot to delete their accounts.

Leaving old accounts active can be a security nightmare. Think about all the personal information you have just sitting there, waiting to be scavenged by cybercriminals. Let’s face it, Tom from MySpace probably isn’t keeping up with security protocols.

It’s critical to be proactive and delete all of your old accounts you no longer use.

Go through your browser, your email and wrack your brain for all the accounts and services you’ve signed up for. If you find some you’re not using, don’t just let them linger. Take the time to shut down your old accounts the right way.

This can be a lot of work, but there’s a site that can help make the process easy. It’s called AccountKiller and will help you wipe the slate clean. Tap or click here to learn more about AccountKiller and easily get rid of those old accounts.

3. Some things are supposed to stay between you and your doctor

According to a survey by security company Carbon Black, a frightening 84% of health care organizations say they have seen an increase in cyberattacks over the past year. Cybercriminals have been targeting hospitals and clinics due to the sheer amount of data these places store.

It’s not all just patient information, either. There’s also data on doctors and insurance companies. Stolen information is sold on the Dark Web and ranges mostly from forgeries to health insurance credentials.

If someone steals your identity, you could be subject to medical identity theft. This act means you might be denied coverage because someone has already used your medical insurance benefits.

How can you protect yourself? Only share your insurance card when it’s absolutely necessary, and report a missing card to your insurance company right away. Avoid posting about health issues online; the less info potential scammers know about you, the better. Check any statements or bills you receive thoroughly, and contact your insurance company or doctor if you see a charge or service you don’t recognize.

PRIVACY PRO TIP: Creepy data broker sites collect a shocking amount of information — but you can remove your data and opt out. Tap or click here to take this important privacy step.

4. Don’t be fooled

When criminals first started sending phishing emails, they were pretty easy to spot. Tons of grammatical and spelling errors tipped us off to the fact that no, our banks couldn’t possibly have sent that message.

However, today’s crooks have learned that lesson and are now sending professional looking messages. They spoof logos that look so real they can be difficult for even experts to spot. The most important rule to outsmarting phishing scams is to avoid clicking malicious links. That means you shouldn’t click on web links or open PDF attachments found in unsolicited email messages — ever.

If you need to conduct business with a company, it’s always best to type its web address directly into your browser. Never trust a link inside a message, and be wary of downloading anything you didn’t specifically ask for.

5. Before you hit ‘buy’

Shopping online is convenient and takes out all the hassles associated with heading to the mall. But have you ever heard of e-skimming? It’s when your credit card information is skimmed by a criminal while you’re buying stuff online. You don’t even know it’s happening until it’s too late.

This epidemic is getting worse as hackers have figured out how to skim credit cards from ordinary online retailers without being detected. They do this by using tricky bits of code while they lie in wait and capture your data as you’re typing it in.

Does that mean you need to stop shopping online all together? No, but you should take steps to shop smarter. For starters, check the connection to the site you’re on. Look for a lock or a URL that begins with HTTPS instead of just HTTP. If it’s not secure, find what you’re shopping for elsewhere.

Be wary of any deals that seem too good to be true. Coupons for crazy discounts or free products could be a trap to get your payment info.

You should also consider ditching your credit card all together when you buy online. Tap or click for 3 safer ways to pay online.

6. Not worth the risk

One of the biggest mistakes people make is connecting to unsecured Wi-Fi networks. Sure, everyone wants to save on data, but joining a public Wi-Fi network at the coffee shop or airport is a terrible idea.

Crooks are always trolling these public networks, watching and waiting for new victims to rip off. If you must use a public network, always use a VPN when you connect. The free ones are slow. You’re better off paying a small monthly fee for a robust VPN.

7. Stay up to date

Shelling out over a grand for the latest and greatest smartphone isn’t very economical. But if you are using a super old device that can’t support updates, you could be putting your personal data at risk.

That’s because many operating system updates come with critical security patches that keep crooks from stealing your information. Without these patches, you’re a serious contender for identity theft, which could wind up costing you more than what you’d pay for a new phone.

Keep all your devices updated to the latest software you can, and seriously consider a new smartphone if yours is several versions behind.

Not updating your OS is just one silly thing you may be doing that puts you at risk online. Tap or click for 7 security basics you really need to stop ignoring.

8. Low-tech tricks

Though criminals have sophisticated hacking tools at their disposal, there are old-fashioned spying tricks that still work to this day.

We’re talking about the common thief rummaging through your trash, hoping to find personal information you may have written down and thrown away. Take the time to shred any sensitive documents before carelessly throwing them in the trash. This includes bank statements, financial documents, medical bills and anything else with identifying information.

Also, be careful of what you say out loud. Eavesdroppers might be listening in if you’re in public making a payment over the phone and reading your credit card information out loud.

When in doubt, assume someone is watching or listening and guard your info accordingly.

9. Threats at home, too

It’s sad I have to mention this, but it’s not just hackers who can steal your identity. It could be a family member or friend.

That’s why it’s essential to keep passwords and important documents in a safe place. Don’t just leave things with information like Social Security numbers and banking information sitting around the house.

Keep sensitive documents locked in a drawer, cabinet or safe deposit box. Stop writing down passwords and login info, and store or shred financial statements as soon they arrive in the mail.

There was a time when our house phones would ring off the hook with annoying, unknown and unwanted calls. The immediate reaction would be to use *69 to trace where the call originated from.

Today, these annoying messages are coming in the form of emails. Each of these messages leads down the same road, which ends with a phishing scam or some sketchy request to reveal your personal data.

If you really want to check the credibility or authenticity of an email, you’ll need to dig deeper and establish where the email originated from — a virtual *69 if you will.

What digital lifestyle questions do you have? Call Kim’s national radio show and tap or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to or watch the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet, television or computer. Or tap or click here for Kim’s free podcasts.

Colorado Parents: High school teacher assigned sexually explicit material by pedophile

Colorado high school is under fire for assigning sexually explicit material – which contained vulgar language and passages about sexting with minors – without parental consent.

Brett Cason, the father of Skylar, a 16-year-old student at Steamboat Springs High School, was shocked when his daughter told him about the sexually charged graphic assignments she had in her “Music Literature” class.

Ryan Ayala, the teacher who crafted a lesson around the poem “Howl” by Allen Ginsberg, apologized in a letter to the Casons saying it was the “most offensive” material covered in his class, after he didn’t get parental consent requiring students to fill in blanks such as “f—ed in the a–” and “c–t” and other lewd language.

The poem was in a book approved by the school board, but it had the words considered offensive censored. Ayala had students fill in the censored parts of the poem.

Brett Cason and his daughter, Skylar, who was assigned sexually explicit material in a “Music Literature” class without parental consent. The district apologized Monday. (First Liberty Institute)

Skylar explained feeling guilty and shameful as her teacher asked them about the symbolism of the phrase “granite c–k” during a classroom discussion. In another assignment students were asked to review a song that talked about sexting and offering sexual favors to a teenager, something that “blindsided” school officials when they found out about it from Cason.

“Students should never feel shame and guilt as part of an assignment at school,” Jeremy Dys, First Liberty special counsel for litigation and communications, representing Cason, told Fox News.

“In the age of MeToo and Harvey Weinstein, it’s hard for me to understand why Superintendent [Brad] Meeks would think requiring teenage girls to meditate on a song normalizing sexting would be acceptable,” Dys added. “If they want to teach on controversial materials, they can, but they should warn parents and give them an opportunity to choose an alternative assignment.”

Steamboat Springs High School Teacher Ryan Ayala assigned a sexually explicit assignment to teenagers without parental consent. The teacher and district have since apologized after parents expressed anger. (Steamboat Springs High School/Google Earth)

On Monday, First Liberty sent a letter to the district asking for an apology to parents and training so the policies are followed.

When asked if the district is taking action against the teacher, Brad Meeks, Ph.D., the Steamboat Springs School District superintendent, pointed Fox News to a statement issued Monday apologizing that “parents were not given advance notice that would have allowed them to opt their child out of participating” in a work he described as “considered controversial by some for its use of expletives and portrayals and descriptions of sexual matters.”

Meeks said the district is working to make sure teachers are aware of “proper procedures around incorporating controversial materials” and follow them, as well as giving alternative assignments for students who opt out.

“We do believe that what occurred this fall was simply an oversight as a result of not understanding the policy,” Meeks wrote. “We regret if members of our community were offended.”

Caleb Parke is an associate editor for FoxNews.com. You can follow him on Twitter @calebparke

Man Accused of Slaying Pregnant Wife & Kids Is ‘Scott Peterson, Just Less Charismatic’: Profiler Dale Yeager

People Dale Yeager

Chris Watts
Chris Watts
Weld County Sheriff’s Office

For many, it was the most startling twist in a case full of mysteries: A day before he was accused of their murders, Colorado dad Chris Watts stood outside his home and pleaded for the safe returns of his wife and two young daughters, who had seemingly vanished a day earlier.

However, investigative experts tell PEOPLE, Watts’ behavior comes as no surprise.

“He has an incredibly large ego,” says Dale Yeager, a criminal analyst and forensic profiler who is unconnected with the case, adding, “He really comes off as sociopathic. That doesn’t mean he is mentally ill, just that he has a personality defect.”

Drawing a parallel between Watts’ case and that of Scott Peterson, who notoriously murdered his pregnant wife and then repeatedly gave interviews, Yeager says, “He’s Scott Peterson, just less charismatic.”

Speaking to local TV station KMGH outside his home in Frederick on Tuesday, the 33-year-old Watts said of wife Shanann Watts and girls Bella and Celeste:

“If somebody has her and they’re not safe, I want them back now.”

“That’s what is in my head. If they’re safe right now, they’re going to come back,” Chris said. “But if they’re not safe right now, that’s the not-knowing part. Last night I had every light in the house on, I was hoping that I would just get ran over by the kids just running in and barrel-rushing me, but it didn’t happen. And it was just a traumatic night trying to be here.”

Chris was arrested on suspicion of first-degree murder the following night.

Shanann’s body was found Thursday on the property of an oil company where Chris had worked. Authorities believe the remains of their daughters were found later that same day, not far away.

Chris remains in jail, scheduled to return to court next week to be formally charged, and his attorney did not respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

In court on Thursday, prosecutors said — without elaborating — that they believe Shanann was killed along with their daughters in their house.

The trio was reported missing Monday afternoon about 12 hours after Shanann returned from a business trip in Arizona.

Shanann, who was 15 weeks pregnant, had been preparing for a sex reveal party scheduled for this Saturday, according to a friend.

Her brother has previously said she was going to give birth to a boy to be named Nico.

From left: Chris and Shanann Watts

From left: Chris and Shanann Watts

Yeager, the profiler, says he thinks Chris likely believed he would be able to get away with his alleged crimes, given his inflated ego.

“His ability to lie is very clear,” Yeager believes. “He is a manipulator and manipulators, their ego is so high, they see the people that are holding them back as objects they can dispose of. From that interview, you can tell he has convinced himself this is good for him and it’s very Machiavellian in that regard.”

Yeager suspects financial and marital woes may have played some part in the murders but noted that was merely speculation based on years of analyzing similar crimes.

Authorities have not disclosed either causes of death for Shanann and her daughters or a motive in their slayings.

However, a family friend previously told PEOPLE she and Chris “were having marital problems.”

Scott Peterson (right) with his late wife, Laci Peterson

Scott Peterson (right) with his late wife, Laci Peterson
ZUMA Press

 

Chris Watts’ TV interview ‘echoed behaviour’ of death row killer who murdered pregnant wife says Profiler Dale Yeager

Mirror London Dale Yeager

Watts’ behaviour is similar to that of Scott Peterson, who gave interviews to the press appealing for information about his missing pregnant wife Laci before being charged

Murder accused Chris Watts’ TV interview in which he appealed for information about his missing family echoes the behaviour of a man who also killed his pregnant wife, a profiler has claimed.
Watts is due to appear in court today charged with murdering daughters Bella, four, and Celeste, three and wife Shanann, who was 15-weeks pregnant with a baby boy they were going to name Nico.

Last week he sobbed on TV as he appealed for the return of the trio before allegedly confessing he had killed them.

In a previous case that gripped America, Scott Peterson also reported his wife Laci, who was seven and a half months pregnant with their son Connor, as missing.

He gave interviews to the press before being charged with murder.

Criminal analyst and forensic investigator Dale Yeager, who is unconnected to Watts’ case, commented on the apparent similarities between the two cases.

Chris Watts' TV interview echoed the behaviour of Scott Peterson who was convicted of murdering his pregnant wife Laci
Chris Watts’ TV interview echoed the behaviour of Scott Peterson who was convicted of murdering his pregnant wife Laci (Image: ABC)

“He [Watts] has an incredibly large ego,” Yeager told People magazine.

“He was very convincing in front of the camera.

“He’s Scott Peterson, just less charismatic.”

Peterson, who is now on death row in Modesto, California, reported his wife Laci missing on Christmas Eve 2002.

She was pregnant with their son Connor and she was due on February 10 the following year.

Scott Peterson is on death row after being convicted of murdering his pregnant wife Laci in 2002
Scott Peterson is on death row after being convicted of murdering his pregnant wife Laci in 2002 (Image: San Quentin State Prison)
Peterson reported his wife missing on Christmas Eve in 2002 and gave interviews to the press about her disappearance before eventually being charged with her murder
Peterson reported his wife missing on Christmas Eve in 2002 and gave interviews to the press about her disappearance before eventually being charged with her murder (Image: Getty Images North America)

But officers said his behaviour behind the scenes was unusual in that he didn’t seem to care how the investigation was progressing.

The lead investigators on Laci’s case, Jon Buehler and Allen Brocchini, spoke to Peterson on Christmas Eve and said they found his behaviour odd.

Mr Buehler told ABC News: “I suspected Scott when I first met him. Didn’t mean he did it, but I was a little bit thrown off by his calm, cool demeanor and his lack of questioning…

“He wasn’t, ‘Will you call me back? Can I have one of your cards? What are you guys doing now?'”

Peterson’s affair and financial issues were used by the prosecution as motives for Laci’s murder.

CHRIS WATTS TIMELINE OF EVENTS

Prosecutors said he murdered his wife because of their mounting debt and he wanted to be single again.

Forensic psychiatrist Dr Keith Ablow, who wrote a book about Peterson, told Inside Edition: “In every case I have looked at, they all make sense – it may be a terrible kind of sense but the narrative makes sense – that the birth of that child represented a kind of death, an impending death for the man.”

Peterson was convicted of first-degree murder of his wife and second degree murder of their unborn son in 2004.

Fourteen years later Watts stood outside the family home and pleaded for the safe return of his family, who he had already allegedly murdered, following the more recent tragedy.

Chris told local news station KMGH: “If somebody has her and they’re not safe, I want them back now. That’s what is in my head.

“If they’re safe right now, they’re going to come back. But if they’re not safe right now, that’s the not-knowing part.

Peterson was sentenced to death and remains on death row
Peterson was sentenced to death and remains on death row (Image: Getty Images North America)

“Last night I had every light in the house on, I was hoping that I would just get ran over by the kids just running in and barrel-rushing me, but it didn’t happen. And it was just a traumatic night trying to be here.”

He reportedly confessed to killing his pregnant wife and daughters and was arrested on suspicion of first-degree murder the next day.

Body language expert have said Watts' TV interview showed tell tale signs that he was lying
Body language expert have said Watts’ TV interview showed tell tale signs that he was lying (Image: 9 News)

DailyMirror

Chris Watts Has ‘Personality Connections’ To Murderer Scott Peterson, Says Forensic Profiler Dale Yeager

Hollywood Life with Dale Yeager

EXPERT SAYS

Chris Watts, who allegedly killed his family and hid the bodies, shares a personality with famed murderer Scott Peterson, a forensic profiler says exclusively. Here’s what he says they have in common.

Chris Watts‘ alleged killing of his pregnant wife and two small children is drawing frequent comparisons to Scott Peterson‘s murder of his pregnant wife Laci in 2003. Like Peterson, who was convicted of first-degree murder in Laci’s death, and second-degree murder of their unborn son in 2004, Watts gave multiple interview pleading with the public to help find his missing family.

“If somebody has her and they’re not safe, I want them back now. That’s what is in my head. If they’re safe right now, they’re going to come back,” Chris said in an interview outside his home in Frederick, Colorado with TV station KMGH. “But if they’re not safe right now, that’s the not-knowing part. Last night I had every light in the house on, I was hoping that I would just get ran over by the kids just running in and barrel-rushing me, but it didn’t happen. And it was just a traumatic night trying to be here.”

He would be arrested on nine felony accounts, including first-degree murder, the next day after confessing to killing 34-year-old Shannan and hiding her body, as well as the bodies of daughters Bella, 3, and Celeste, 4; he claims that Shannan allegedly “strangled” their daughters, and maintains that he did not kill them.  Forensic profiler Dale Yeager of SERAPH tells HollywoodLife EXCLUSIVELY, that, “there are very clear personality connections between Chris [Watts] and Scott Peterson, except for the fact that Chris seemed to be less outgoing and is not as dynamic as Scott.”

Yeager says that there are “key factors” in Watts’ case that could “lead him” to allegedly murder his family and hide the bodies. “There was an incredible amount of debt; the couple was irresponsible in the way they were spending money,” Yeager explained. “All the fundamentals are there for this kind of behavior — the financial stress and stress in the marriage.”

It was revealed in Watts’ unsealed arrest affidavit that he confessed to cheating on Shanann. Though Chris previously denied having an affair, he reportedly admitted to it during a two-day investigation, according to the affidavit. One of Shanann’s friends, Nickole Atkinson, the last person to see her before she went missing, said that Shanann and Chris were allegedly discussing a separation.

“For Chris to [allegedly] make the leap from adultery to murder [means] he had to be at a point where he could get to such a dark place, mentally, that he could justify very ugly, evil behavior,” Yeager said. “People who cheat don’t have a moral compass. If you commit adultery in a relationship, you are a vile person because you’re a liar and a con-artist. You don’t care about the people you hurt, including your own children.

People make excuses for this bad behavior and they’re so narcissistic that they don’t care who it hurts,” Yeager continued. “Narcissism is like selfishness on steroids and it includes a certain amount of delusion…He can justify it all day, but what he’s saying is he feels justified in lying and deceiving the people closest to him.”