Tag Archives: school shooting

ALERT: New Mexico ‘extremist Muslim’ group ‘training kids to commit school shootings’

Extremist Muslim school shootings U.S.

 if “released from custody, there is a substantial likelihood defendants may commit new crimes due to their planning and preparation for future school shootings”.

A man arrested after 11 malnourished children were found in a remote desert compound was training them to commit school shootings, US media report.

According to prosecutors’ documents, Siraj Ibn Wahhaj was teaching some of the children, who are aged one to 15, how to use weapons.

Amalia suspects Siraj Wahhaj and Lucas Morton

Mr Wahhaj was one of two armed men arrested at the scene on Friday in New Mexico. Three women were also arrested.

Police say the remains of a boy were also discovered at the compound.

Found on Monday, the remains are those of Mr Wahhaj’s missing three-year-old son, Abdula-Ghani Wahhaj, the Taos News reports.

Mr Wahhaj is suspected of abducting the boy from his Georgia home in December, and it was the search for him that led to the arrests.

The toddler suffered from seizures according to the missing person’s report filed by his mother.

But Mr Wahhaj believed the boy needed to be exorcised, say court papers.

Dirty clothing and makeshift structures at the compoundImage copyrightTAOS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Image captionThe compound had no running water and children were living in squalid conditions.

Prosecutor Timothy Hasson filed the documents on Wednesday, but did not discuss the accusations in court, the Associated Press reported.

Mr Hasson requested that Mr Wahhaj be held without bail.

“He poses a great danger to the children found on the property as well as a threat to the community as a whole due to the presence of firearms and his intent to use these firearms in a violent and illegal manner,” Mr Hasson wrote in court documents.

CNN reports the legal filings also warn that if “released from custody, there is a substantial likelihood defendants may commit new crimes due to their planning and preparation for future school shootings”.

The complaint cites a foster parent of one of the 11 children as saying Mr Wahhaj “had trained the child in the use of an assault rifle in preparation for future school shootings”, US media say.

All five adults arrested at the compound last week face child abuse charges.

Lucas Morton was the other man arrested at the scene.

Three women, believed to be the children’s mothers, were also “arrested without incident” and booked into the Taos Adult Detention Center, according to the sheriff’s office.

Police have not explained what connection the women – named as Jany Leveille and Subhannah Wahhaj, both 35, and 38-year-old Hujrah Wahhaj – have to each other.

The officers who discovered the children said they looked “like Third World country refugees not only with no food or fresh water, but with no shoes, personal hygiene and basically dirty rags for clothing”.

Authorities had raided the site after receiving a message from someone that read: “We are starving and need food and water.”

Location of Compound near Amalia

Police said they had been aware of the compound for some time but had to wait for a search warrant before entering, as the occupants were “most likely heavily armed and considered extremist of the Muslim belief”.

Mr Wahhaj was armed with an AR-15 rifle and four pistols when they encountered him, they said.

According to New York media, Mr Wahhaj’s father, Imam Siriaj Wahhaj, is a prominent Muslim leader in Brooklyn, who has been called “one of the most admired Muslim leaders” in the US.

He reportedly testified as a character witness at the trial for Omar Abdel-Rahman, who was later convicted of the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center.

In 1991, he became the first Muslim to lead an opening prayer before the US House of Representatives.

Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz heard voices to ‘Burn, kill, destroy’, confession says

Nikolas Cruz

The teenager accused of killing 17 people at a Parkland, Florida high school in February said in a taped confession that he heard “voices” in his head and wanted someone to “just kill me,” according to a transcript released Monday.

Nikolas Cruz, 19, told a detective that the voices in his head began after his father died, and worsened after his mother died of pneumonia, just months before the rampage. Cruz said a voice at one point told him to “Burn, kill, destroy.”

Cruz also told police during the interview, conducted right after his arrest for spraying bullets into his classmates at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School on Valentine’s Day, that the voices told him to buy a gun.

The transcript was released by the State Attorney’s Office in Broward County on Monday and a video of portions of the confession will be released Tuesday.

At one point, the detective doing the interview, John Curcio, asked Cruz if he wanted a drink of cold water. Cruz replied, “I don’t deserve it.”

Curcio left the room briefly to get him a cup of water anyway. That’s when Cruz, alone in the room, remarked that he wished he could be killed. Cruz continued to say on the recording that he deserved to die.

“I want to die,” Cruz said during the recording. “At the end, you’re nothing but worthless s—, dude. You deserve to die because you’re f—ing worthless and you f—ing (unintelligible) everyone. I want to die.””

Details of the shooting are blacked out, but the transcript otherwise deals with the death of Cruz’s parents, his penchant for killing animals, his former girlfriend, his brother, guns, suicide attempts and, especially, the voice.

Cruz said he heard the voice the morning of the shooting, according to the confession transcript.

Much of the 217-page confession is redacted. According to Florida law, any information revealing “the substance of a confession” is exempt from public disclosure until the case is resolved. A Broward County judge last month ruled the non-confession portions of Cruz’s post-shooting statements could be made public, according to the Associated Press. Cruz’s attorneys did not want the document disclosed, saying it would hinder his right to a fair trial, the AP reported.

The content of the transcript is expansive; Cruz discusses his brother, his ex-girlfriend, being adopted, previous drug use and incidents in which he killed animals. Cruz mostly talked about the voice in his head.

Cruz told the detective about his suicide attempts. He said after his mom died, he tried to kill himself by swallowing over-the-counter pain medication. Another time, he tried to poison himself with alcohol.

The transcript shows Cruz spoke so softly at times, the detective had trouble hearing and asked him to speak up multiple times.

Cruz asked the detective to call a psychologist. When the detective asked him what he wanted to talk to a psychologist about, Cruz said, “To find out what’s wrong with me.”

Cruz told the detective he bought his first gun at 18 and collected three shotguns, an AR-15, a handgun and an AK-47. His mother had taken him to buy some of the guns, the transcript states.

The detective asked him whether his mom ever asked why he was buying so many guns. Cruz said he told her they were for his protection and because they looked “cool.” He also said the voice wanted him to buy guns.

Cruz told the detective he bought guns to protect himself from the voice and also kept the guns locked up to keep the voice from getting to them. Cruz estimated he spent about $4,000 on firearms and ammunition.

Cruz told the detectives multiple times he was lonely. He had no friends and scared girls away, Cruz said.

The voice in his head kept him from being lonely. Curcio asked him if the voice was like an imaginary friend.

“Almost, yes,” Cruz said.

The detective asked him why he wanted to be friends with someone who tells him to do bad things.

“To have somebody,” Cruz said.

The detective asked Cruz whether the voice told him to buy the AR-15 he is accused of using in the shooting. Cruz said yes.

“I don’t really believe there is a voice to be honest with you,” Curcio told Cruz.

Cruz insists there is a voice.

The detective doubles down on Cruz about there not being a voice toward the end of the interrogation. Curcio insisted Cruz simply liked guns and that was why he amassed them.

The detective asked Cruz why he never tried to stop the “demon” and the voice. Curcio told Cruz he could have sought help with a psychologist, seen a priest or told his mom while she was still alive. The suspected gunman could have asked for medication or smoked marijuana, which Cruz had already done and said helped quiet the voice, Curcio said during the interrogation.

Cruz had a multitude of ways to stop the demon in his head, according to Curcio.

At that point, Cruz appeared to become agitated. He asked Curcio if he could have some time to think about the demon and why he hadn’t tried to stop it.

“I think you like the demon,” Curcio told Cruz.

“I don’t like the demon. I don’t like the demon. I don’t like the demon. I don’t like the demon,” Cruz said.

Eventually, Cruz asked for an attorney and repeated four times, “I’m scared.”

“Why wouldn’t he protect me?” Cruz asked.

Curcio said he didn’t know, walked out of the room and told Cruz to yell if he needed anything.

When Curcio left, Cruz said: “Why didn’t he kill me? Why didn’t he kill me? Why didn’t he kill me? Why didn’t he kill me? Why didn’t he kill me?”

Curcio returned and handcuffed Cruz’s hands behind his back.

, Naples Daily News

BREAKING: Broward Student Lays Out Devastating Case Against School Board For Neglecting School Safety

On Thursday, Broward County student Kenneth Preston, 19, published the findings of an in-depth investigation he has conducted over the last two months that has uncovered some alarming details about how the Broward County School Board neglected school safety leading up to the Parkland massacre.

Preston confronted the school board two weeks ago and gave his account of what he’d learned to The Hill. In his initial findings, Preston said that he believed that since 2014, the school has only spent around 5% of the over $100 million available to it specifically for school safety. In his new report, he details ways that the failure to invest in school safety may have led to the deaths of some of the students in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting. The school board’s embrace of progressive programs, including The Promise Program and the Behavior Intervention Program, Preston maintains, has protected problem students — like the student who eventually slaughtered 17 people in February — shielding them from effective disciplinary measures and thus allowing them to remain threats to their peers.

“After weeks of research, searching through thousands of pages of government documents, and speaking with dozens of officials, I have come to the conclusion that Superintendent Runcie and members of the school board have failed at their essential role in keeping our students safe. Whether that’s because of incompetence or the incentive of federal dollars is for you to decide based on the evidence provided below,” Preston writes. “Ultimately, no matter what laws pass, the extent, or how infrequent these shootings become, if the people who were complicit in facilitating an environment in which something like this could occur don’t face consequences, then there is no justice.”

In a series of tweets Thursday, Preston provided key details from his investigation (h/t Twitchy):

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

Parkland parents, students, I went to the Broward School Board to seek answers for the potential negligence by Superintendent and Board prior to the tragedy at Stoneman. Instead of addressing our concerns, they prevented us from speaking. Read on to understand why.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

Parkland parents, students, I went to the Broward School Board to seek answers for the potential negligence by Superintendent and Board prior to the tragedy at Stoneman. Instead of addressing our concerns, they prevented us from speaking. Read on to understand why. pic.twitter.com/Ppomdtl3BA

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

2) Just to clarify, I’ll be referring to the shooter exclusively by his case number, 18-1958, for the duration of this thread in respect of the families wishes not to give any attention to his name. So, here’s what you need to know.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

2) Just to clarify, I’ll be referring to the shooter exclusively by his case number, 18-1958, for the duration of this thread in respect of the families wishes not to give any attention to his name. So, here’s what you need to know.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

3) Over the last month, I’ve dug through thousands of government document pages and interviewed dozens of people. I found evidence of two things: over $100m in school safety funds that have gone unspent and policies that keep violent students (like 18-1958) out of jail.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

3) Over the last month, I’ve dug through thousands of government document pages and interviewed dozens of people. I found evidence of two things: over $100m in school safety funds that have gone unspent and policies that keep violent students (like 18-1958) out of jail.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

4) First, the money. In 2014, Broward Schools was given an $800m bond, with over $100m specifically for school safety. Since then, delays have led to only 5% of the money spent. Despite safety being the #1 priority of the bond, many projects were delayed to avoid increased cost.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

4) First, the money. In 2014, Broward Schools was given an $800m bond, with over $100m specifically for school safety. Since then, delays have led to only 5% of the money spent. Despite safety being the #1 priority of the bond, many projects were delayed to avoid increased cost.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

5) In a tweet, Superintendent @RobertwRuncie called our report “fake news” and suggested we contact @FloridaTaxWatch, an independent group tasked with helping to oversee the distribution of the money. So I did. FL TaxWatch VP of Research Bob Nave agreed with my numbers. pic.twitter.com/hjo256j3vt

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

5) In a tweet, Superintendent @RobertwRuncie called our report “fake news” and suggested we contact @FloridaTaxWatch, an independent group tasked with helping to oversee the distribution of the money. So I did. FL TaxWatch VP of Research Bob Nave agreed with my numbers. pic.twitter.com/hjo256j3vt

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

6) One of those delayed projects was a $1m fire system for Stoneman Douglas. People familiar with the project told me that the district considered upgrading its systems with an “alarm sequence”, that allows a delay to determine if there’s an actual fire before the alarm triggers.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

6) One of those delayed projects was a $1m fire system for Stoneman Douglas. People familiar with the project told me that the district considered upgrading its systems with an “alarm sequence”, that allows a delay to determine if there’s an actual fire before the alarm triggers.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

7) When Stoneman’s fire alarm sounded, students fled from their classrooms directly into the path of the shooter. The “positive alarm sequence” would have kept the alarm from sounding for up to three minutes if it was determined there was no fire, and in this case, there wasn’t.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

7) When Stoneman’s fire alarm sounded, students fled from their classrooms directly into the path of the shooter. The “positive alarm sequence” would have kept the alarm from sounding for up to three minutes if it was determined there was no fire, and in this case, there wasn’t.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

8) The school resource officer was aware of shots fired within one minute of the alarm. In a situation like this, seconds count. Had the alarm been put in on time and with the suggested upgrade, that delay could have potentially saved students from running into the line of fire.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

8) The school resource officer was aware of shots fired within one minute of the alarm. In a situation like this, seconds count. Had the alarm been put in on time and with the suggested upgrade, that delay could have potentially saved students from running into the line of fire.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

9) In a meeting with Runcie & officials, I was told the system wasn’t invented when the money was allocated and that it wasn’t suggested until last year. However, the tech has existed since the 80s, and the Fmr Dir. of School Safety recommended a similar system years ago. pic.twitter.com/fppWs1vN5K

View image on Twitter

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

9) In a meeting with Runcie & officials, I was told the system wasn’t invented when the money was allocated and that it wasn’t suggested until last year. However, the tech has existed since the 80s, and the Fmr Dir. of School Safety recommended a similar system years ago. pic.twitter.com/fppWs1vN5K

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

10) Part Two of the Investigation: Broward’s discipline policies that help keep potentially dangerous students like 18-1958 in schools and out of jail.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

10) Part Two of the Investigation: Broward’s discipline policies that help keep potentially dangerous students like 18-1958 in schools and out of jail.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

12) In 2013, @browardschools and @browardsheriff signed an agreement to consider alternatives to arrest when dealing with student misconduct. On the agreement’s list, it says that if a crime constitutes a felony, the officer may “consider” placing the student under arrest. pic.twitter.com/dFuJOkyo5J

View image on Twitter

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

12) In 2013, @browardschools and @browardsheriff signed an agreement to consider alternatives to arrest when dealing with student misconduct. On the agreement’s list, it says that if a crime constitutes a felony, the officer may “consider” placing the student under arrest. pic.twitter.com/dFuJOkyo5J

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

13) This agreement was part of an effort to lower student arrests by reshaping school discipline. As a result, troubled students who previously would have been reported to police are now entered into “rehabilitation programs.” Within years, Broward’s arrest rate plummeted. pic.twitter.com/d2JptAlPBW

View image on Twitter

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

13) This agreement was part of an effort to lower student arrests by reshaping school discipline. As a result, troubled students who previously would have been reported to police are now entered into “rehabilitation programs.” Within years, Broward’s arrest rate plummeted. pic.twitter.com/d2JptAlPBW

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

14) Even if students aren’t enrolled in these programs, school admins aren’t required to report potentially dangerous students to law enforcement. The current discipline matrix gives administration complete discretion to decide “appropriate consequences” for student misbehavior. pic.twitter.com/YtoI4VEPJI

View image on Twitter

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

14) Even if students aren’t enrolled in these programs, school admins aren’t required to report potentially dangerous students to law enforcement. The current discipline matrix gives administration complete discretion to decide “appropriate consequences” for student misbehavior. pic.twitter.com/YtoI4VEPJI

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

15) An example of the danger in these policies would be middle school student Jayla Cofer, who was attacked so brutally that she was hospitalized with bruised legs, torn skin, and deep wounds. Her attackers were never arrested, but instead placed in a rehabilitation program. pic.twitter.com/sqDZEhjWpE

View image on Twitter

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

15) An example of the danger in these policies would be middle school student Jayla Cofer, who was attacked so brutally that she was hospitalized with bruised legs, torn skin, and deep wounds. Her attackers were never arrested, but instead placed in a rehabilitation program. pic.twitter.com/sqDZEhjWpE

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

16) More recently, two students from Flanagan High claimed that a fellow student was threatening to kill over 20 people. The student was briefly suspended and allowed to return back to campus alongside the students he threatened to kill. The list goes on. pic.twitter.com/9FC8VoZkrI

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

16) More recently, two students from Flanagan High claimed that a fellow student was threatening to kill over 20 people. The student was briefly suspended and allowed to return back to campus alongside the students he threatened to kill. The list goes on. pic.twitter.com/9FC8VoZkrI

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

17) Similar to these incidents, 18-1958 was never arrested despite threatening to kill students, bringing bullets to school, and being involved in multiple fights. Had he been charged and convicted, he likely wouldn’t have had access to weapons he used.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

17) Similar to these incidents, 18-1958 was never arrested despite threatening to kill students, bringing bullets to school, and being involved in multiple fights. Had he been charged and convicted, he likely wouldn’t have had access to weapons he used.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

18) After I presented this info, the Superintendent and Board took time to defend themselves instead of allowing survivors to speak. The Superintendent praised music, athletic and tech programs, but failed to acknowledge that all of those programs were prioritized over safety.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

18) After I presented this info, the Superintendent and Board took time to defend themselves instead of allowing survivors to speak. The Superintendent praised music, athletic and tech programs, but failed to acknowledge that all of those programs were prioritized over safety.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

19) Board Member @ReverendRos went as far as to suggest that our inquiry into these concerns was an exploitation of bloodshed for “personal gain”. She’s the same board member who removed her kids from the school district over “safety concerns.” pic.twitter.com/on4nIjn5vZ

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

19) Board Member @ReverendRos went as far as to suggest that our inquiry into these concerns was an exploitation of bloodshed for “personal gain”. She’s the same board member who removed her kids from the school district over “safety concerns.” pic.twitter.com/on4nIjn5vZ

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

20) Ultimately, it was the shooter and only the shooter who’s responsible for killing 17 and injuring 17 more. It’s also true, however, that the officials tasked with keeping our children and teachers safe have failed in that essential role.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

20) Ultimately, it was the shooter and only the shooter who’s responsible for killing 17 and injuring 17 more. It’s also true, however, that the officials tasked with keeping our children and teachers safe have failed in that essential role.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

21) Despite these failures, there hasn’t been a single change in leadership. Parkland and this community deserve leaders who put our children first. In the coming weeks, we’ll announce our plans to do exactly that. We have mourned, we have marched, and now we mobilize.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

21) Despite these failures, there hasn’t been a single change in leadership. Parkland and this community deserve leaders who put our children first. In the coming weeks, we’ll announce our plans to do exactly that. We have mourned, we have marched, and now we mobilize.

Kenneth Preston@kennethrpreston

Everything I’ve claimed is sourced and available in my full length investigative report that you can find here: https://medium.com/@kennethrpreston/an-investigation-into-broward-countys-school-board-superintendent-4789bbd5b2e5 

An Investigation Into Broward County’s School Board & Superintendent

Motivation

medium.com

3 Questions Every Parent Should Ask School Board Members About Their Children’s Safety

School Safety SERAPH
School Safety SERAPH

Get a group of parents together write a letter [this is required by Federal and State law IDEA] with these questions then submit it to your school board:

  1. What proof of Prevention policies and training do they have? [denial of entry to a school]
  2. Do they have a formal process for outside security walks every 15-30 minutes? [if the school has security guards make them show you the plan]
  3. Has a Federal level [U.S. Department of Education –  United States Department of Justice] security MANAGEMENT audit been done in the last 12 months?

Don’t assume the leadership has done this. GET THE FACTS!