ALERT! France Bans Commercial With Positive View of Children With Down Syndrome

French ban on Down Syndrome Ad
French ban on Down Syndrome Ad

The shame of France continues. This George Will op-ed will explain the outrageous act by the French court.

As the brother of a sister with mental retardation and a brother who is deaf, I am disgusted.

by George Will

The word “inappropriate” is increasingly used inappropriately.

It is useful to describe departures from good manners or other social norms, such as wearing white after Labor Day or using the salad fork with the entree. But the adjective has become a splatter of verbal fudge, a weasel word falsely suggesting measured seriousness. Its misty imprecision does not disguise, it advertises, the user’s moral obtuseness.

A French court has demonstrated how “inappropriate” can be an all-purpose device of intellectual evasion and moral cowardice. The court said it is inappropriate to do something that might disturb people who killed their unborn babies for reasons that were, shall we say, inappropriate.

Prenatal genetic testing enables pregnant women to be apprised of a variety of problems with their unborn babies, including Down syndrome. It is a congenital condition resulting from a chromosomal defect that causes varying degrees of mental disability and some physical abnormalities, such as low muscle tone, small stature, flatness of the back of the head and an upward slant to the eyes. Within living memory, Down syndrome people were called Mongoloids.

Now they are included in the category called “special needs” people. What they most need is nothing special. It is for people to understand their aptitudes, and to therefore quit killing them in utero.

Down syndrome, although not common, is among the most common congenital anomalies at 49.7 per 100,000 births. In approximately 90 percent of instances when prenatal genetic testing reveals Down syndrome, the baby is aborted. Cleft lips or palates, which occur in 72.6 per 100,000 births, also can be diagnosed in utero and sometimes are the reason a baby is aborted.

In 2014, in conjunction with World Down Syndrome Day (March 21), the Global Down Syndrome Foundation prepared a two-minute video titled “Dear Future Mom” to assuage the anxieties of pregnant women who have learned that they are carrying a Down syndrome baby.

More than 7 million people have seen the video online in which one such woman says, “I’m scared: what kind of life will my child have?” Down syndrome children from many nations tell the woman that her child will hug, speak, go to school, tell you he loves you and “can be happy, just like I am — and you’ll be happy, too.”

The French state is not happy about this. The court has ruled that the video is — wait for it — “inappropriate” for French television. The court upheld a ruling in which the French Broadcasting Council banned the video as a commercial. The court said the video’s depiction of happy Down syndrome children is “likely to disturb the conscience of women who had lawfully made different personal life choices.”

So, what happens on campuses does not stay on campuses. There, in many nations, sensitivity bureaucracies have been enforcing the relatively new entitlement to be shielded from whatever might disturb, even inappropriate jokes.

And now this rapidly metastasizing right has come to this: A video that accurately communicates a truthful proposition — that Down syndrome people can be happy and give happiness — should be suppressed because some people might become ambivalent, or morally queasy, about having chosen to extinguish such lives because…

This is why the video giving facts about Down syndrome people is so subversive of the flaccid consensus among those who say aborting a baby is of no more moral significance than removing a tumor from a stomach. Pictures persuade.

Today’s improved prenatal sonograms make graphic the fact that the moving fingers and beating heart are not mere “fetal material.” They are a baby. Toymaker Fisher-Price, children’s apparel manufacturer OshKosh, McDonald’s and Target have featured Down syndrome children in ads that the French court would probably ban from television.

The court has said, in effect, that the lives of Down syndrome people — and by inescapable implication, the lives of many other disabled people — matter less than the serenity of people who have acted on one or more of three vicious principles: That the lives of the disabled are not worth living.

Or that the lives of the disabled are of negligible value next to the desire of parents to have a child who has no special, meaning inconvenient, needs.

Or that government should suppress the voices of Down syndrome children in order to guarantee other people’s right not to be disturbed by reminders that they have made lethal choices on the basis of one or both of the first two inappropriate principles.

The Real Castro Legacy Is Not Pretty: Child Murder – Abuse of Women and more

Children Murdered by Castro
Children Murdered by Castro

As the delusional mourn the passing of Fidel Castro. Millions around the world do not, including those who have suffered or lost loved ones because of his reign of terror in Cuba and around the world [Venezuela, Angola to name a few].

These pictures are of children he murdered. When do the clueless understand how evil this man was.

Below is a picture of the mothers and grandmothers murdered and tortured by the Castro government. When do we care?

Castro Victims
Castro Victims

 

 

U.S. CRACKS DOWN ON FEMALE TEACHERS WHO SEXUALLY ABUSE STUDENTS

Female Teacher Sex Offenders
Female Teacher Sex Offenders

A “Saturday Night Live” skit about a male student having sex with his female high school teacher painted the relationship as every teen boy’s dream, but drew a firestorm of criticism on social media.

The reaction to the comedy sketch reflected a growing view among law enforcement and victims’ advocacy groups that it is no laughing matter when a woman educator preys on her male students.

In U.S. schools last year, almost 800 school employees were prosecuted for sexual assault, nearly a third of them women. The proportion of women facing charges seems to be higher than in years past, when female teachers often got a pass, said Terry Abbott, a former chief of staff at the U.S. Department of Education, who tracked the cases.

This year’s numbers are already slightly ahead of last year with 26 cases of female school employees accused of inappropriate relationships with male students in January compared to 19 cases the previous January.

Female educators who sexually abuse their students are facing tougher prosecution in part because there are more women police officers. There is also a greater awareness among prosecutors, judges and the general public that students who are victimized by an authority figure, regardless of gender, experience trauma with life-long consequences.

“Law enforcement is increasingly feminized, and women are much less prone to the old attitude: ‘Oh, this is just some kid who got lucky,’” said David Finkelhor, director of the Crimes Against Children Research Center. “They recognize the issues involved and they go after women who violate the statutes.”

Depression and difficulty maintaining future relationships are among the long-term consequences that male victims face, according to experts. Those problems are sometimes compounded by confusion and guilt over whether they are actually victims since their adolescent bodies involuntarily respond to physical contact.

‘SEISMIC SHIFTS’

Child abuse experts agree it appears female teachers are being prosecuted more vigorously than in the past.

The crackdown is the result of “two seismic shifts,” said Christopher Anderson, executive director of Male Survivor, the largest U.S. advocacy organization for male sex-crime victims.

“One is a recognition that it does not matter who the perpetrator is or what the circumstances are. A teacher has absolutely no business engaging in sexual contact with a student,” Anderson said. “The second is a shift in the culture where boys and their parents are feeling empowered to come forward to say that something has been done.”

In recent weeks, a Stamford, Connecticut high school English teacher, Danielle Watkins, 32, whose case was prosecuted by a female state’s attorney, was sentenced to up to 10 years in prison for having sex with an underage male student.

In Michigan, a female judge sentenced Madison High Spanish teacher Kathryn Ronk, 30, to up to 15 years in prison for having a sexual relationship with a 15-year-old boy, saying “the law does not recognize a double standard.”

In New Jersey, a female prosecutor said the most lenient plea deal she would offer Nicole Dufault, 35, a Columbia High School English teacher accused of sexual relationships with six teenage boys, was 15 years in prison.

There are contrary examples, such as Pennsylvania’s Erica Ann Ginnetti, 35, the Lower Moreland High School math teacher who had sex with a 17-year-old student and was sentenced to 30 days in jail by a male judge who said, “What young man would not jump on that candy?”

That was after a female prosecutor reportedly said in court that the victim’s senior year became a nightmare, his grades plunged and he still struggles with social interactions.

But the Twitter furor ignited by the April “SNL” skit in which a male judge fist-bumps a boy who had sex with his “hot” teacher indicates how attitudes are changing.

“Appalled by the #SNL sketch glorifying sexual abuse of a male student by female teacher. Sends the worst message &minimizes real experiences,” tweeted Heather Timmis @hnt108.

An SNL spokesperson declined to comment.

There is no central U.S. reporting system for tracking female teachers who prey on male students, according to federaleducation officials, but Abbott has been charting the crimes from news coverage. His research showed that female teachers far more often than male teachers use social media to lure students, creating an electronic “paper trail” that may aid prosecutions.

School districts are increasingly moving to ban private social media contact between teachers and students, sometimes in an effort to prevent inappropriate relationships.

“Social media enables the behavior to start,” Abbott said. “There is no way that a teacher is going to walk up to a kid in the hallway and say, ‘Hey, would you like to see a naked picture of me?’ They won’t do it. But they will do that on social media. It’s like it erases what used to be that barrier.”

(Reporting by Barbara Goldberg; Editing by Scott Malone and Andrew Hay)

 

ARE YOU SAFE AT WORK? PROFILER SAYS NO

workplace shooting SERAPH
workplace shooting SERAPH.net

2 million employees of U.S. businesses are victimized each year. While at work employees suffered 396,000 aggravated assaults, 84,000 robberies, 1,000 homicides and 51,000 rapes and sexual assaults against women.

Criminal analyst, Dale Yeager believes that most violence committed on the job could be stopped with proper training and management changes.

Yeager of SERAPH.net, who has studied the trend for the past 20 years, says that all workplace shootings are preventable.

“In each workplace shooting there were numerous indicators of the shooters exhibiting aggression and being socially isolated. These are two volatile components for a workplace crime.” says Yeager. “Workplace shootings are a direct result of poor management of employees.  A well managed organization is a safe organization.”

Yeager says that a profile has been created by the U.S. Justice Department to identify individuals who are most likely to committee these types’ violent acts:

1. Male, 25-50 years of age.

2. High stress level usually caused by financial problems or workplace conflicts.

3. Socially isolated [few friends or activities outside of work, usually separated or divorced].

4. If married, has a deteriorating home life.

“The security of companies begins and ends with the hiring of quality people, effective discipline of problem employees, holding managers accountable for aggressive behavior and the proper monitoring of fired employees.” says Yeager.

GET THE FACTS 

History Channel Forensic Profiler Dale Yeager “3 Myths About Bullying”

3 Myths About Bullying Dale Yeager
3 Myths About Bullying Dale Yeager

Dale Yeager Forensic Profiler and costar of the new History Channel series ‘True Monsters’, has published a new Amazon Kindle book for parents entitled “3 Myths About Bullying”.

Yeager who worked for the Boulder District Attorney’s office in 1997 on the original murder investigation of JonBenet Ramsey, has released an e-book on bullying titled “3 Myths About Bullying” What Every Parent and Grandparent Should know to Protect Children and Grandchildren. The book focuses on inaccurate information about bullying that Yeager says can endanger children.

The book focuses on three myths:

Myth 1: Bullies Come From Violent Lower Class Families
Myth 2: Children Are Victims Of Bullying Because Schools Fail To Protect Them
Myth 3: Males Fight, Females Tease

What do parents and grandparents need to know about stopping or preventing the bullying of their children or grandchildren? First they need to know the facts. ORDER HERE

 

Black Guns Matter!

Maj Toure Black Guns Matter
Maj Toure Black Guns Matter

Whatever your political bent please read:

Maj Toure, founder of Black Guns Matter, points out that the National Rifle Association (NRA) stood with blacks during the 1960s when Democrat-comprised groups like the Ku Klux Klan were terrorizing and attacking them.

While speaking to Ebony magazine about his “Black Guns Matter” group, Toure explains that the NRA stood with the “Deacons for Defense,” a group of black men who armed themselves in the 1960s to fight off white terror in the Democrat-controlled south.

Ebony asked him about the NRA and whether the NRA has a responsibility to stand up for the black community. Toure responded first by stressing his belief that the black community has to take care of itself and stop “passing the buck.” But he also stressed that the NRA stood with the black community in the racially turbulent 1960s–a time when few others did.

Toure said:

I think the NRA isn’t responsible to jump up. They are a civil liberties organization. They’re not there to do the work we, as a community, aren’t doing. They’re there as a resource for people to use to understand and exercise and learn. They’re not lawyers, per se. We can’t keep passing the buck. As far as I understand, the organization [is] only beholding [sic] to [its] members and if you’re not a member, there’s a different question there.

He then addressed the claim that the NRA should get involved whenever questions of justice are raised by a video of a black man and a white police officer, saying:

When things happen, local businesses, like Walmart, should be leaned on. Local politicians need to be checked. Local authorities need to be fired. Things of that nature. That’s what spurs change. I don’t rely on the NRA. I rely on our hard work and our persistence to fix things. The NRA has done enough to prove what their position is, in regard to the Second Amendment. The NRA has helped the Deacons for Defense in the late ‘60’s with [Rev. Martin Luther] King.

Dave Kopel provides historical context for understanding the Deacons of Defense:

In 1964, CORE [the Congress for Racial Equality] began community organizing in the pine mill town of Jonesboro, La. One night, the local police led a Klan motorcade through black neighborhoods, strewing Klan flyers, and then heading to the local jail to threaten imprisoned civil rights workers.

That summer, about 20 black Army veterans had informally founded a community defense patrol. They adopted the name “Deacons for Defense and Justice” because most of them were practicing Christians, and they aimed to serve their communities in a Christian manner. The Deacons conducted nighttime auto patrols of black neighborhoods, communicating via Citizens Band radios and walkie-talkies. core worked closely with the Deacons, and soon, the energy and pride provided by the Deacons had helped make Jonesboro one of CORE’s best-organized towns.

Inspired by the visible public presence of boldly armed men, the attitudes of blacks in Jonesboro began to change. Black housekeepers stopped accepting racial taunts, and quit if the taunts continued. “Armed Negroes Make Jonesboro Unusual Town,” observed a Feb. 21, 1965, New York Times article.

On the day the Times article was published, a second chapter was formed—this one in Bogalusa, La., another mill town, and a notorious Klan stronghold. The Bogalusa chapter’s president, Charles Sims, said, “Let’s back up the Constitution of the United States and say we can bear arms. We have a right to defend ourselves. …”

On March 8 of that year, the Deacons for Defense and Justice formally incorporated as a Louisiana non-profit organization. The corporate charter explained that the group’s purpose was “the defense of civil rights, property rights and personal rights … and [to] defend said rights by any and all honorable and legal means to the end that justice may be obtained.” Just like April 19—the first battle of the American Revolution—March 8 is a day that should be forever celebrated to honor armed Americans who defended liberty.

Toure wants his fellow black citizens to understand that the NRA stood with the Deacons of Defense while Democrat groups like the Ku Klux Klan fought against them.

Kopel describes the NRA as the Deacon for Defense’s “arsenal of democracy.”

AWR Hawkins Breitbart News 

 

 

A NATIONAL DISGRACE! Congress Disrespects WWII Veterans 

Disrespect Veterans Dale Yeager Blog
Disrespect Veterans Dale Yeager Blog

By Thomas Gibbons-Neff

A bill that would honor members of the World War II-era organization that was the forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency as well as some of the U.S. military’s most elite units has — despite broad bipartisan support — stalled in Congress.

The bill would bestow the Congressional Gold Medal on the few remaining veterans of the Office of Strategic Services, or OSS, many of whom who are in their 80s and 90s. The bill has 320 co-sponsors in the House, and a companion bill was unanimously passed in the Senate in March. The hold-up, however, appears to center on a recently passed congressional rule that prevents groups or organizations — as opposed to individuals — from being awarded the medal.

Before the most recent session of Congress, groups of World War II veterans such as the Tuskegee Airmen — the famed group of African American aviators who fought in the skies over Europe — have received the medal, and earlier this year the rule was waived so the medal could be awarded to civil rights activists who led the 1965 “Bloody Sunday” march in Selma, Ala. Yet for the aging members of the OSS, a waiver has remained elusive, with the House’s Republican leadership largely silent on why that has been the case.

The waiver, known as a “suspension of the rules,” must first be proposed by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and approved by the rest of the House’s senior leadership which would allow a bill to be passed by the House Financial Committee, chaired by Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-Tex.), and then be brought to the floor for a vote.

Hensarling’s office told the Dallas Morning News earlier this week that he “looks forward to voting in favor of the bill” and said he had nothing to do with the award’s current limbo-like status.

A House leadership aide, who was not allowed to speak publicly on the matter, said in an email that the bill “violates conference rules and a waiver has not been considered and there is no timetable for consideration.”

The office of House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) deferred questions to McCarthy.

The current iteration of the bill was introduced last November by Rep. Robert E. Latta (R-Ohio). (In 2013, Latta had proposed a similar bill.) According to the Dallas Morning News, Latta plans to seek passage of the legislation before the 115th session of Congress begins in January and the bill has to be reintroduced.

“The effect the OSS has had in shaping our national security structure is unparalleled,” said Latta in a statement that was released when the bill was first announced in November. “I introduced this legislation to call upon Congress to collectively recognize these brave men and women for their efforts, and honor them for their extraordinary service on behalf of this great nation.”

In a statement released Monday, the Office of Strategic Services Society, a group that represents OSS veterans, said that if the bill is not passed before the 114th Congress adjourns, it “will die and some of the greatest heroes of the “Greatest Generation” will never be honored for their service.”

“General Donovan said OSS personnel, who were drawn from every branch of the military, performed ‘some of the bravest acts of the war.’ Their bravery deserves to be recognized with a Congressional Gold Medal,” said OSS Society President Charles Pinck in the statement.

Started in 1942 and led by Donovan, who famously called the OSS his “glorious amateurs,” the organization was involved in covert operations around the world. Members of the OSS infiltrated Nazi Germany, trained resistance fighters in China and helped gather intelligence deep behind enemy lines. At the conclusion of the war, the OSS’s boat teams would slowly morph into the Underwater Demolition Teams that became the Navy SEALs. Other parts of the OSS would become the Army’s Special Forces Groups. At the conclusion of the war, the OSS was dissolved, but many of its veterans served in the Central Intelligence Agency when it was created.

In the front foyer of CIA headquarters, across from the wall honoring the agency’s dead since 1947, is a book listing the names of those who died serving with the OSS and a statue of Donovan.

Lack of Funding by Feds & States is Killing Cops

ua-1

 

How Budget Battles Have Endangered Law Enforcement and the Public

Since January 1 of this year over 40 local, state and federal law enforcement officers and special agents have been killed.

A war has been declared on cops by radical political groups, violent loners and organized crime gangs. The general public is not aware of this problem but I am. As a Federal law enforcement instructor I have watched as the budget debates have dramatically affected police training throughout the country.

Major training conferences for such critical issues as sex offender apprehension and gang interdiction have been canceled because of federal funds being cut. The domestic terrorism unit of the Department of Homeland Security has been all but eradicated.

Every American should be outraged.

In my two decade career I have never seen the kinds of budget cuts for police training as I have seen in the past year. Executive officers within law enforcement agencies are concerned.

What’s the cost of this defunding?

Simply put without training police do not develop critical skills and strategy’s to control crime. New strategies to find and secure sex offenders who escaped after hurricane Katrina will not be taught. New safety tactics to protect officers and agents will not be learned.

In the midst of the fiscal debate within the beltway law enforcements’ safety and effectiveness should not be placed on the table with other funding issues.

The people of the U.S. deserve protection and most importantly the law enforcement professionals who protect us deserve the best.

Contact your Congress person and forward this Op-ed to them please.http://www.usa.gov/Contact/Elected.shtml

Gangs Grow in SUBURBAN Schools – A Parent’s Guide to Protecting their Children

Gangs in Suburban Schools SERAPH
Gangs in Suburban Schools SERAPH

The US Department of Justice has released a report that states the growth of criminal gangs is increasing in all socioeconomic areas of the country. The National Youth Gang Survey Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention(OJJDP)

 

Key Points

  • There were an estimated 28,100 gangs and 731,000 gang members throughout 3,500 jurisdictions nationwide.
  • The prevalence rate of gang activity increased to 34.5 percent from 32.4 percent in 2008.
  • Larger cities and suburban counties accounted for more than 96 percent of all gang homicides.

 

Parents’ Guide to Gangs

This guide from the National Gang Center is designed to provide parents with answers to common questions about gangs to enable them to recognize and prevent gang involvement.

Permission is granted by the National Gang Center to make adaptations to the Parents’ Guide to Gangs. The National Gang Center requests that the following language be included when adapting the brochure for local needs: “Adapted from Parents’ Guide to Gangs, National Gang Center.” READ HERE